IGF 2018

Best Practice Forums (BPF)

IGF 2018 - Best Practice Forum on Cybersecurity - Draft Output (pre IGF)

 

INTRODUCTION and INSTRUCTIONS

The Best Practice Forum on Cybersecurity aims to be  bottom-up, open and inclusive and therefore invites all interested to comment and contribute on its draft outputs.

The BPF output consists of a Background document (part I) and a Summary report of public contributions (part II)

General comments as well as comments on specific parts of the report are welcome. In the later case, please  indicate clearly what section, page or paragraph of the text your comment relates to.

Comments can be submitted by clicking on 'Add new comment' below and will be shown in the column on the right. 

Received public feedback will be taken into account in the final version of the BPF output, which will be published shortly after the IGF meeting.

 

 

Part I : Background paper to the IGF BPF on Cybersecurity

 

Cybersecurity culture, norms and values

  • Introduction to the BPF on Cybersecurity
  • Culture, norms and values
  • Background on norms development
  • The case for cyber norms
  • Norms development processes
  • State of existing  norms development and implementation
  • Digital security divide

Download the background paper  & click below to comment 

 

Part II: Summary report of the public contributions to the IGF BPF on Cybersecurity

  • Defining a culture of cybersecurity
  • Typical values and norms of importance to the contributors
  • Organisations promoting specific cybersecurity norms
  • Norms that have been effective at improving security
  • Norms that have failed or had adverse effects
  • Methods of implementing cybersecurity norms
  • A Digital Security Divide

Download the Summary report   & click below to comment

IGF 2018 - Best Practice Forum on IoT, Big Data, AI - Draft Output (pre IGF)

INTRODUCTION and INSTRUCTIONS

The Best Practice Forum on Internet of Thing, Big Data, Artificial Intelligence aims to be  bottom-up, open and inclusive and therefore invites all interested to comment and contribute on its draft output.

General comments as well as comments on specific parts of the report are welcome. In the later case, please  indicate clearly what section, page or paragraph of the text your comment relates toPost a comment.

Comments can be submitted by clicking on 'Add new comment' below and will be shown in the column on the right. 

Received public feedback will be taken into account in the final version of the BPF output, which will be published shortly after the IGF meeting.

 

BPF on IoT, Big Data, AI - draft output (download report / post a comment )

I. Introduction

  1. The IGF BPF on IoT, Big Data, AI
  2. Framing the work of the BPF IoT, Big Data, AI
  3. Objectives of the BPF output
  4. Methodology and acknowledgementII

II. An Introduction to IoT, Big Data, AI

  1. Introduction
  2. Definitions
    1. Internet of Things
    2. Big Data
    3. Artificial Intelligence
    4. How IoT, Big Data, and AI come together
    5. Proposed Best Practices (regardiing definitions)

III. The key role of Internet Governance

  1. Internet Governance Challenges
  2. Proposed Best Practices (regarding uses of IoT, Big Data, and AI)
  3. Role of Internet Governance with regard to IoT, Big Data and AI

IV. Stakeholder cooperation - Best practice examples and experiences in addressing Internet Governance challenges of IoT, Big Data and AI

V. Next steps ?

Download the document  & click below to comment

       

IGF 2018 - Best Practice Forum on Local Content - Draft Output (pre IGF)

INTRODUCTION and INSTRUCTIONS

The Best Practice Froum on Local Content aims to be  bottom-up, open and inclusive and therefore invites all interested to comment and contribute on its draft output.

General comments as well as comments on specific parts of the report are welcome. In the later case, please  indicate clearly what section, page or paragraph of the text your comment relates toPost a comment. 

Comments can be submitted by clicking on 'Add new comment' below and will be shown in the column on the right. 

Received public feedback will be taken into account in the final version of the BPF output, which will be published shortly after the IGF meeting.

 

Draft output of the BPF on Local Content (download report / post a comment)

  1. Introduction

    1. Framing the BPF on Local Content
    2. Local Content
    3. Focus of the 2018 BPF on Local Content
    4. Methodology and acknowledgements
  2. Developing a Local Content industry / value chain

    1. Towards a sustainable local content value chain
    2. "New models" and initiatives 
    3. Creating and enabling environment, creating opportunities
  3. Policy initiatives to promote and support the local creation of online content

Download the document and click below to comment. 

              

IGF 2018 - Best Practice Forum Gender and Access - Draft Output (pre-IGF)

INTRODUCTION and INSTRUCTIONS

Best Practice Forum  Gender and Access has functioned in a bottom-up, multi-stakeholder, and community-driven manner to gather stories, experiences, and lessons for producing this pre-IGF Output Document draft. Drawing on the same process, BPF Gender invites all interested to comment and contribute in its draft outputs.

General comments as well as comments on specific parts of the report are welcome. In the later case, please  indicate clearly what section, page or paragraph of the text your comment relates to.

Comments can be submitted by clicking on 'Add new comment' below and will be shown in the column on the right. 

Received public feedback will be taken into account in the final version of the BPF Gender output, which will be published shortly after the IGF meeting.

Thank you for your valuable comments!

Download the BPF Gender pre-IGF Output Document draft

CONTENTS

  • Executive Summary  
  • Interpretation Notes    
  • Acronyms and Abbreviations    
  • Part A: Findings    
    • 1. Supplementary Models of Connectivity for Women and Gender Non-Binary Persons    
      • 1.1 Barriers to Internet Access for Women and Gender Non-Binary Persons    
      • 1.2 Relevance of Supplementary Models of Connectivity to Internet Access for Women and Gender Non-Binary Persons    
        • 1.2.1 Availability    
        • 1.2.2 Affordability    
        • 1.2.3 Culture and norms    
        • 1.2.4 Availability of relevant content    
        • 1.2.5 Women's participation in decision-making roles pertaining to the Internet    
      • 1.3 Why do we need a gender focus for supplementary models of connectivity?    
    • 2. Community Networks    
      • 2.1 What are Community Networks?    
      • 2.2 Mapping Community Network Initiatives for Women and Gender Non-Binary Persons and their Impact    
    • 3. TV White Spaces    
      • 3.1 What is TV White Spaces (TVWS)?    
      • 3.2  Mapping TV White Spaces Initiatives for Women and Gender Non-Binary Persons and their Impact    
    • 4. Other Supplementary Models of Connectivity    
    • 5. Recommendations for incorporating gender perspectives on Supplementary Models of Connectivity    
  • Part B: Mandate and Methodology    
    • 1. Mandate    
      • 1.1 The IGF    
      • 1.2 Defining the BPF’s mandate    
    • 2. Methodology    
      • 2.1 Working Approach    
      • 2.2 Survey    
        • 2.2.1 Survey Design    
        • 2.2.2 Survey Analysis    
        • 2.2.3 Diversity of Respondents   
      • 2.3. Virtual Meetings   
      • 2.4 Mobile Messaging   
      • 2.5 Mailing List   
      • 2.6 Email   
      • 2.7 Main Session at IGF   
    • 3. Limitations   
  • Part C: Appendices   
    • APPENDIX 1: CONTRIBUTORS    
    • APPENDIX 2: BPF SURVEY    
    • APPENDIX 3: BPF SESSION PRE-REPORT AT IGF 2018    
    • APPENDIX 4: BPF SESSION REPORT AT IGF 2018    

Download the BPF Gender pre-IGF Output Document draft
 

Connecting and Enabling the Next Billion (CENB)

IGF 2018 - Policy Options for Connecting and Enabling the Next Billions (CENB): Phase IV - Draft Output (pre-IGF)

INTRODUCTION and INSTRUCTIONS

Policy Options for Connecting and Enabling the Next Billions (CENB) IV has functioned in a bottom-up, multi-stakeholder, and community-driven manner to gather stories, experiences, and lessons for producing this pre-IGF Output Document draft. Drawing on the same process, CENB IV invites all interested to comment and contribute in its draft outputs.

General comments as well as comments on specific parts of the report are welcome. In the later case, please  indicate clearly what section, page or paragraph of the text your comment relates to.

Comments can be submitted by clicking on 'Add new comment' below and will be shown in the column on the right. 

Received public feedback will be taken into account in the final version of the CENB IV output, which will be published shortly after the IGF meeting.

Thank you for your valuable comments!

Download the CENB IV pre-IGF Output Document draft

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • Executive Summary  
    • Table of Contents 
    • Acknowledgements    
    • Interpretation Notes    
    • Abbreviations    
  • Introduction    
    • IGF Inter-sessional Work    
    • Policy Options for Connecting and Enabling the Next Billions    
    • Objectives for Phase IV    
    • Methodology    
    • Structure of this Report    
  • Advancing the Sustainable Development Goals   
    • SDG 7 – Affordable and Clean Energy   
      • Relevance    
      • Case Studies   
        • Case 1: Mawingu Networks, Kenya   
        • Case 2: SunCulture, Kenya    
        • Case 3: M-Kopa, Kenya    
        • Case 4: MeshPower, Rwanda   
        • Case 5: ME Solshare, Bangladesh   
        • Case 6: Agsol, Kenya    
        • Case 7: Sigora, Haiti    
        • Case 8: Solaris Offgrid, Tanzania, Uganda    
      • Common Themes   
    • SDG 8 - Decent Work and Economic Growth   
      • Relevance    
      • Case Studies    
        • Case 1: Community Network in Tusheti, Georgia    
        • Case 2: Community Partnerships through Libraries, Romania    
        • Case 3: Providing Access to Legal Information, IFLA and EIFL    
        • Case 4: IFA Krishi, Nepal    
        • Case 5: CEDRO, Peru    
        • Case 6: Fairtrade, Papua New Guinea   
        • Case 7: YISHDA, Nigeria   
        • Case 8: Informal Business Sector Institute, Kenya   
        • Case 9:  Mucho Mangoes, Kenya    
        • Case 10: EIFL Projects, South Africa, Bulgaria, Croatia, Lithuania    
      • Common Themes    
    • SDG 9 - Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure    
      • Relevance    
      • Case Studies  
        • Case 1: Lavazza Project, Colombia   
        • Case 2: BOSCO, Uganda   
        • Case 3: Colnodo, Colombia   
        • Case 4: Community Network in Zapotec, Mexico   
        • Case 6: Internet Village Motoman Project, Cambodia   
        • Case 7: Zero Connect by Wireless for Communities, India   
        • Case 8: Brightwave Networks, South Africa   
        • Case 9: IREX Community Technology Hubs, Myanmar   
        • Case 10: Red Chaski and Atalaya Sur, Argentina   
      • Common Themes   
    • SDG 17 - Partnerships for the Goals   
      • Relevance   
      • Case Studies   
        • Case 1: World Economic Forum Internet for All   
        • Case 2: IEEE Internet Inclusion Initiative   
        • Case 3: EQUALS   
        • Case 4: Telecom Infra Project   
        • Case 5: Microsoft Airband Initiative   
        • Case 6: CITEL   
        • Case 7: EIFL and Beyond Access, Kenya and Bangladesh   
      • Common Themes   
  • Conclusion: Weaving Common Threads to Advance the SDGs   
  • Appendices   
    • A: Discussion Paper submitted to the MAG   
    • B: Call for Public Inputs   
    • C: List of Contributions   

Download the CENB IV pre-IGF Output Document draft

Youth Engagement at the IGF 2018 and Ways for Improvements

ABOUT

The IGF community has demonstrated its interest and commitment to enhancing  youth engagement in the IGF. The emerging growth of the existing youth IGF initiatives1 was welcomed as a positive and proactive approach  that  Internet Governance should be discussed among all stakeholders, in an open and inclusive process, following the bottom up agenda setting. The IGF community further outlined this view during the IGF Retreat to advance the 10-years IGF mandate hosted in 2016, noting that after ten years, the IGF is growing and maturing. Many positive engagement efforts were recognized, in particular as far as the youth and NRIs are concerned2.
 
In addition, alongside the self-organizing, multistakeholder youth IGF initiatives, the IGF community took concrete steps toward ensuring that the long-term discussion process shaped around the core IGF principles is maintained as a response to an increasing complexity of the Internet Governance issues and their direct influence on people’s lives.

During the 2017 IGF Taking Stock process, the IGF community called on the IGF to support improving youth engagement in the IGF processes, and in the IGF itself. In this regard, the synthesis outcome document of all received inputs to the mentioned Taking Stock process noted that a number of inputs also called for more engagement of youth, including as organisers of IGF sessions, and for supporting them to the extent possible through sponsorship programmes offered by various organisations in the IGF community3

The IGF Secretariat, within its capacity, responded to the community’s inputs as mentioned above, and conducted several open public consultations on youth engagement at the IGF. This process primarily focused on gathering existing best practices, as summarized in the dedicated publication4, and later continued to facilitate the community’s open consultation during the 12th annual IGF meeting in Geneva5, and post-meeting discussions through online consultations6

Mentioned publication on the Youth engagement at the IGF, outlined and described four major models of practices present across different communities: 

  • Practice I: Youth Initiatives organised by the national, subregional, and regional IGF initiatives
  • Practice II: Independently organised Youth Initiatives
  • Practice III: Integration of youth in the NRIs' preparatory processes or programmes
  • Practice IV: Additional projects to build youth participation in Internet Governance

These allowed for the community to understand what are the existing mechanisms that various communities implement on the matter, that further helped in mapping the areas where improvements are needed.

Finally, the overall open consultation process mentioned above, resulted in several proposals and recommendations on how to improve the engagement of youth in the IGF, now addressed to the wider IGF community.

The wider IGF community and all interested stakeholders are invited to contribute to these recommendations with their constructive comments by 6 July 2018, 23:59 p.m. UTC.

Comments added to this platform, should respond to the feasibility of the proposed activities, and to potential entities that could carry the implementation of these.
Please note that comments should be signed, and that no anonymous comments will be taken into consideration, in accordance with the IGF’s practice.

 

A BRAINSTORMED LIST OF POSSIBLE ACTIVITIES  TO STRENGTHEN YOUTH ENGAGEMENT IN THE IGF

 

SUGGESTION 1: Developing content materials for youth regarding the IGF process and topics of interest
A set of concrete materials should be developed, in order for youth to have relevant, comprehensive resources to consult in order to build awareness of the IGF; its purpose and core principles, and how to engage. These materials should be focused on the IGF process, including user-friendly materials on how to engage via online participation; and on the substantial topical issues that are being discussed at the IGF.

While the materials that explain the IGF process could be developed by the IGF Secretariat, substantive topical materials could be developed by the relevant experts from the IGF community; drawn from the intersessional work efforts, etc. 

SUGGESTION 2: Organize info-webinars to explain the IGF process and annual meeting structure 
Prior to the annual IGF meeting, a set of webinars could be organized to explain the IGF process, and annual meeting structure, to help in preparing participants for the annual IGF meeting.
It was advised that the IGF Secretariat facilitates the process.

SUGGESTION 3: Establish a mentoring or coaching  programme
To establish a programme for making possible for youth to be connected to more experienced stakeholders from the IGF community. It was suggested that the MAG members, the Dynamic Coalitions (DCs) coordinators and the National, Regional and Youth IGF Initiatives (NRIs) coordinators could be a good starting point source for implementing this activity. 
It was proposed that there could be online meetings between the mentors and mentees prior to the annual face to face IGF meeting. An online webinar between all mentors and mentees could be organized prior to the annual face-to-face IGF meeting. 
Mentors would advise on how to integrate and benefit from the IGF, and potentially, on topics of interest to mentees.
Alternatively, the mentorship programme could be organized as a peer-to-peer concept.
 

SUGGESTION 4: Online observatory of available resources
The IGF Secretariat could facilitate coordination activities with various formations focused on youth engagement at the IGF, and have these connected with other stakeholders of relevance who agree to a specific youth dialogue. 
The community noted that there are many available opportunities for youth engagement present globally, but that there is a lack of unique searchable resources. It was suggested to create an online observatory of relevant informational resources and opportunities.  
The Internet Community Wiki Platform could be a potential partner for developing this platform, where all stakeholders, independently, could upload information of relevance for the youth community.  

SUGGESTION 5: Dedicated sessions on the topic of youth engagement to be organized during the annual IGF meeting
During the 13th IGF, a dedicated session focused on different models of youth engagement at the IGF should be organized. The session should allow for an exchange of good practices.
It was noted that there are at least four existing models, including involvement of youth activities/initiatives within existing NRIs, thus session facilitation is proposed to be organized in a bottom up process, facilitated by the IGF Secretariat.

SUGGESTION 6: Facilitating IGF related updates
It was suggested that a dedicated mailing list for announcing IGF related updates is needed. A 'news announcements from the IGF' online section could be developed and moderated by the IGF Secretariat.  

LIST OF REFERENCES

1List of recognized Youth IGF Initiatives. Available at: https://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/content/youth-initiatives
2IGF RETREAT PROCEEDINGS: Advancing the 10-Year Mandate of the Internet Governance Forum (IGF). Available at: https://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/index.php?q=filedepot_download/..., page 13, section 3.
3Synthesis Paper: Contributions to Taking Stock of IGF 2017 and Looking Forward to IGF 2018. Available at: http://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/index.php?q=filedepot_download/5..., page 9, paragraph 33.
 4Youth engagement at the IGF: looking at existing examples of practices. Available at: https://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/index.php?q=filedepot_download/...
 5Work Meeting with Youth Initiative at the 2017 IGF annual meeting: summary report. Available at: https://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/index.php?q=filedepot_download/...
 6Youth engagement at the IGF and ways for improvements: Open Consultations with the Youth IGF initiatives and other stakeholders: summary report available at: http://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/content/igf-2018-nris-preparator...