IGF 2019 WS #419 Who owns us? Personal Data Rights Today and Tomorrow

Organizer 1: Lee McKnight, Syracuse University
Organizer 2: Arsene Tungali, Rudi International
Organizer 3: Minda Moreira, Internet Rights and Principles Coalition (IRPC)
Organizer 4: Dr. Francis Kateh, Deputy Minister, Ministry of Health, Republic of Liberia
Organizer 5: Renata Aquino Ribeiro,

Speaker 1: Jane Coffin, Technical Community, Western European and Others Group (WEOG)
Speaker 2: Dr. Francis Kateh, Government, African Group
Speaker 3: Bruna Santos , Civil Society, Latin American and Caribbean Group (GRULAC)

Policy Question(s): 

This workshop will explore new approaches and treatment of
trusted data, including the most sensitive data about our own person. Who
owns us? How can blockchain, AI, and other new technologies, as well as law and ploicy changes, provide a more hopeful distributed model and satisfactory proposition for
all of us? And especially, develop personal data rights that are protected by technology, law, and practice.

Relevance to Theme: Data governance models have been too limited and too restrictive on how we all would wish our data to be treated. A more explicit, permsissions based model for self-soverign data governance would permit individuals to participate in and profit from their own data - if they chose to do so, and data markets and technologies existed to enable transactions to occur. Enter the blockchain, to make it cheap, easy and fast for our data governance preferences to be clearly stated, and potentially, legally enforced.

Relevance to Internet Governance: The work builds on prior work on prior Internet governance work on shared principles, norms, rules, decision-making procedures. Specifically, we would build on prior work within the framework of the Charter on Internet Rights and Principles developed by the Dynamic Coalition on Internet
Rights and Principles of the UN Internet Governance Forum, and other related
instruments

Format: 

Round Table - Circle - 90 Min

Description: This workshop will explore new approaches and treatment of distributed,
trusted data, including the most sensitive data about our own person. Who
owns us? Can blockchain and other new technologies transform this worn
debate into a more hopeful distributed model and satisfactory proposition for
all of us? This workshop will consider a call to establish our 31st Right,
extending from the 30 Rights enumerated in the Twentieth Century in the UN
Declaration of Human Rights.

With the GDPR now in force, firms and nations are reviewing their data
policies to mitigate risk of incurring substantial penalties. Beyond loss
avoidance, many people, insurers, and regulators are weary of repeated
scandals as use and abuse of legitimately collected but inappropriately used
or protected personal data remains rampant. Do we not have a 21st Century
right to our own data?

Expected Outcomes: We expect to share the results of the workshop with stakeholders including interested governments, firms, and civil society organizations worldwide.
New law and policy practices for personal data will follow from this workshop.

Onsite Moderator: 

Arsene Tungali, Civil Society, African Group

Online Moderator: 
Rapporteur: 

Marianne Franklin, Civil Society, Western European and Others Group (WEOG)

Discussion Facilitation: 

This workshop will explore new approaches and treatment of distributed,
trusted data, including the most sensitive data about our own person. Who
owns us? Can blockchain and other new technologies transform this worn
debate into a more hopeful distributed model and satisfactory proposition for
all of us? This workshop will consider a call to establish our 31st Right,
extending from the 30 Rights enumerated in the Twentieth Century in the UN
Declaration of Human Rights.

With the GDPR now in force, firms and nations are reviewing their data
policies to mitigate risk of incurring substantial penalties. Beyond loss
avoidance, many people, insurers, and regulators are weary of repeated
scandals as use and abuse of legitimately collected but inappropriately used
or protected personal data remains rampant. Do we not have a 21st Century
right to our own data?

This workshop will consider a call to establish our 31st Right, extending
from the 30 Rights enumerated in the Twentieth Century in the UN Declaration
of Human Rights.

This would build on prior work within the framework of the Charter on
Internet Rights and Principles developed by the Dynamic Coalition on Internet
Rights and Principles of the UN Internet Governance Forum, and other related
perhaps more binding instruments

This workshop is co-sponsored by:
Internet Governance Caucus (IGC) &
Dynamic Coalition on Internet Rights and Principles (DCIRP) &
Hu-manity.co &
Republic of Liberia

VIII. Content of the Session:
This workshop will explore new approaches and treatment of distributed,
trusted data, including the most sensitive data about our own person. Who
owns us? Can blockchain and other new technologies transform this worn
debate into a more hopeful distributed model and satisfactory proposition for
all of us? Do we not have a 21st Century right to our own data?

In this era of digital transformation of nations and firms, should we not
expect novel, and valuable, expansion of human rights? If yes, what are some
of the other new or updated instruments, and innovative mechanisms which may
be desirable? Can blockchain and distributed ledger technology help us
collaboratively reach WSIS objectives and UN sustainable development goals?
Our human data is being bought and sold in a human data marketplace that is
not being respected as our property, Hu-manity.co notes.

This workshop through blockchain actually cuts across all IGF 2018 Themes:
Emerging Technologies, Human Rights, Innovation & Economic Issues, Trust &
Privacy, Development, Cybersecurity, Digital Inclusion and Accessibility,
Technical & Operational Topics, Gender & Youth, Evolution of Internet
Governance.

Workshop Format: Panelists considering collaborative governance case study
of new (proposed 31st) Human Right; followed by Roundtable debating and
refining Recommendations for sustainable, extendable approaches to address UN
SDGs. Followed by Respondents Open Mic. Followed by Rapporteurs. Followed by
Open Mic Last Call

This Workshop Session is organized as follows:
• Call to Order and introduction of the Session: Session Co-Moderators: 3
minutes {1.5 minutes each]
• Panel: 24 Minutes; 4 minutes X 6 speakers (not all confirmed; could be
5, or 4)
• Roundtable: Real-Time Recommendation; or Not: 18 minutes; 3 minutes X 6
speakers (not all confirmed, could be 3 or 4)
• Respondents Open Mic: 30 minutes: this is intended to engage everyone,
whether in the room or remote
• Rapporteurs: 5 minutes: Recommendation Synthesis: The rapporteurs will
collaborate and attempt to indicate text that based on workshop discussions,
could lead event to come to one, or two Workshop conclusions. OK, maybe 3.
They will also be responsible for the submission of the Report.
• FINAL CALL: All workshop participants Open Mic: 10 minutes to Endorse,
Object, or Amend the suggested recommendations
o Youth participants will be invited to start each of the Open Mic sessions
o The Open Mic respondent session segments focus on refining the one, two, or
three draft recommendations suggested by the roundtable. These can be further
debated in varied social media following the workshop, and shared with
relevant BPFs, DCs and CNB.
o Geographically and Otherwise Varied Remote Moderators will use chat to keep
remote participants aware of the discussion and report on any comments and
questions during the Open Mic sessions.

IX. Interventions:
This 90 minute workshop will be structured to give many more voices an
opportunity to be included in the dialog, by combining a 24 Minute Panel to
discuss aspects of the topic, a Roundtable which will debate those views and
whether new Recommendations could be developed, a 25 minute "Open Mic'
Respondents session where remote and in-the-room workshop participants
indicate whether they agree or would like to amend the -hypothetical still -
recommendations, into a few possible Recommendations for further
consideration. Finally, the Rapporteurs will attempt to further synthesize
down and review wording into 2, or 3, workshop recommendations. In the final
7 minutes of the session, to both sustain interest and engagement in the
room and online, the workshop will close again in 'Open Mic' fashion with
youth representatives, and those with accessability concerns, prioritized for
critique, or confirmation, of the by then proposed recommendations.

An illustrative example of this attempt at a high-engagement event, which we
recognize does not follow exactly the usual 'panel' 'roundtable' or other IGF
formats. But with a diverse mix of new and veteran IGF participants from many
parts of the world including several developing countries, we anticipate an
enriching, memorable, and impactful event.

A draft, overfull agenda is below with both confirmed people willing to
participate if the MAG process affords them that opportunity, as well as
prospective participants whose availability and interest is not yet
confirmed. But for whom we anticipate a positive response if their
intervention would be welcomed.

Each of the named participants below have their own views and experience
which would be appropriate, and of interest, to share in this workshop.

(Invited; confirmed where *)

Workshop Co-Moderators: Minda Moreira, DCIRP * & Arsene Tungali, IGC * [Civil
Society]

Distributed Rights Panelists:
Dr. Wilhelmina Jallah, Minister of Health, Republic of Liberia [Government];
& Richie Etwaru, Founder & CEO, Hu-manity.co* [Business]; Phil Murphy,
Governor, New Jersey [Government]; Jane Coffin, VP, Internet Society (ISOC)*
[technical community] Vala Afshar, Salesforce Chief Digital Evangelist
[Business] Bruna Martins dos Santos, Coding Rights, Brazil* [NGO];

Roundtable: Crafting An IGF Recommendation on #My31 in Real Time; or Not
Katitza Rodriguez, EFF [Civil Society]
Akinremi Peter Taiwo, Compsoftnet, Nigeria* [Business]
Eddan Katz, Protocol Design Networks, World Economic Forum [NGO]
Judith Hellerstein, Hellerstein & Associates* [Business]
Karine Perset, Sam Paltridge, or Andrew Wyckoff, OECD [NGO]
Michael dePalma, Hu-manity.co* [Business]

Respondents Open Mic [All workshop participants]

Rapporteurs: Hanane Boujemi, DCIRP* [Civil Society]
Kevin Risser, USAC & DCIRP [Civil Society & Government]
Marianne Franklin, Goldsmiths* [Civil Society]
Lee McKnight, SU * [Civil Society & Technical Community]
X. Diversity:
Diverse organizers have reviewed collaboratively a diverse set of prospective
speakers and participants. Business, government, civil society and technical
community participants are confirmed, from Africa, Latin America, Europe, the
Middle East, and North America.

Many of the speakers and moderators are from developing countries, and
several are first-time IGF participants.
XI.Onsite Moderator: Arsene Tungali (IGC) and Minda Meriem (DCIRP)

Renata Aquino, who has many years of experience assisting and increasing
remote participation for IGF workshops, will play that lead role for this
workshop as well. Co-organized Lee McKnight has run a Remote Hub at Syracuse
University for several years and appreciates the challenges for online
participants, and the organizers of their participation, both online and in
the room where the Workshop is taking place.

Renata is co-author of best practice recommendations for IGF remote
participation, and we intend to aim to maintain her high standard for
inclusion and operational efficiency.

We are ensuring youth and persons with disabilities have several
opportunities to engage as a Respondent in person or remote.

Online participants will interact with regional remote moderators who will
be led by Renata, who will coordinate both with online participants to ensure
the queue prioritizes them, and with the in-room moderators, via chat.

We expect the participants to be respectful of everyone's time and ensure all
who wish to, whether on the workshop agenda or in the room, have an
opportunity to contribute verbally as well as through other mechanisms.

Online Participation: 

We will monitor questions and pause to bring remote participants concerns into the conversation.

Proposed Additional Tools: We plan to be streaming the session to Internet Backpacks in remote communities beyond the reach of the current Internet infrastructure, in Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya, Liberia, Costa Rica, India and Pakistan. Reaching people who will benefit from having their data rights and ownership protected from their initial forays onto the Internet in a way the rest of us were not afforded.

SDGs: 

GOAL 3: Good Health and Well-Being
GOAL 4: Quality Education
GOAL 5: Gender Equality
GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals