Received DC Sessions

IGF 2019 The not-so-free market

DC: 

Dynamic Coalition on the Sustainability of Journalism and News Media

Round Table - Circle - 90 Min

Description: 

As the inaugural session of our Dynamic Coalition, this session is meant to introduce the DC to the IGF community, and consider the wider impact of the digital economy on democratic societies. It will also take a critical look at both the benefits and harms of a world where global platforms are dominant distributors of news and information as well as major forums for public debate. Currently, the sector-specific approach to media regulation is inadequate. Regulatory disparities between digital platforms and heavily-regulated media businesses lead to market advantages that these platforms have (and often abuse). Additionally, many states are taking an approach to online content regulation by essentially “subcontracting censorship” to digital platforms. Thus, the time is right for addressing market mechanism- and failure-related challenges as well as regulatory and ultimately information flow challenges in digital environments. One of the biggest problems with the debates raging in government legislatures and policy circles around the world is the lack of attention given to the news, journalism, and information ecosystems, and the implications of digital platforms’ market power on access and availability of quality news content on the Internet. To foster a pluralistic media ecosystem that strengthens democratic systems, combats dis/misinformation, and produces professional, high-quality, and fact-based news, media sustainability must be considered a significant priority. Any serious effort to address the myriad problems plaguing digital platforms must include competition authorities, economists, media policy experts as well as privacy, digital rights freedom of expression advocates. Building on this context, this session will explore five key issues/questions related to digital market mechanism- and failure-related challenges, including: (1) How to monitor digital platforms’ activities, their market behaviours, and the potential consequences of those activities for citizens, journalists, news media organisations, and advertisers. (2) Strategies to address regulatory imbalances – i.e., what are new approaches to the regulation of digital spaces? (3) How to better inform consumers/citizens of their rights when dealing with digital platforms. (4) What are the mechanisms that would support and sustain choice and quality of news and journalism in digital spaces? (5) Market power and behaviour of digital advertising’s two most-dominant companies, Google and Facebook, what can be done to address competition barriers, and how to promote plurality, sustainability, and diversity as well as overall consumer choices. The session will take a holistic approach to the topic by treating each of these factors as equally important pieces of the larger puzzle of media ecosystem failure as well as the subsequent problems it creates that are currently vexing governments.

Organizers: 

Michael Oghia, Global Forum for Media Development

Speakers: 

Mira Milosevic, Global Forum for Media Development

SDGs: 

GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

IGF 2019 Youth Participation at the IGF

DC: 

Youth Coalition on Internet Governance

Round Table - Circle - 90 Min

Theme: 

Subtheme: 
Description: 

How have young people risen to the occasion in the past year to contribute to IG events and which YCIG 2018 priorities were met to accommodate this?
Handover to the 2020 Steering Committee Complying with the YCIG Statutes, the new Steering Committee is appointed during the IGF following successful elections over the mailing list.
How can the YCIG community rise to the occasion to promote youth participation, advocate for the rights and opportunities for young people in IG and create an environment in which young people can easier engage in the IGF processes? Discussion with/proposals from IGF participants

Organizers: 

Nadia Tjahja, Youth Coalition on Internet Governance/Sunium

Speakers: 

Nadia Tjahja, Youth Coalition on Internet Governance/Sunium (WEOG) (Moderator)
Jawad Tanveer, Youth Coalition on Internet Governance (Asia-Pacific) COMSATS University
Fawad Khan, Youth Coalition on Internet Governance (EEG) EdTech

SDGs: 

GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals

IGF 2019 A taxonomy for Internet Governance Schools

DC: 

Dynamic Coalition on Schools on Internet Goverance

Round Table - Circle - 90 Min

Description: 

Since the session at the 2018 IGF and throughout year, work has continued on developing a Taxonomy for Schools on Internet Governance 9SIG). There is a great variety among existing programs and diverse features of the various types of schools that often makes it difficult to talk about these SIGs and to describe them in a less ambiguous manner. The program this year involves coming to agreement on a first revision on the Taxonomy document. The plan for this session would be to work though any remaining issues in the doc so that it can be used as a tool for the new schools that are being formed every year and as the basis for the next steps in the DC SIG work. One important part of having the discussions at the IGF meeting before finalizing, is the inclusion of non DC members to makes sure the work makes sense to the larger community. A draft of the paper will be published before the annual IGF meeting.

Organizers: 

Sandra Hoferichter, Rainer Rodewald; EuroSSIG Anriette Esterhuysen; AfriSIG, Association for Progressive Communication Avri Doria, SIG Faculty; Technicalities

Speakers: 

Sandra Hoferichter - Moderator Avri Doria - Rapporteur Round table composed of reps from the various Schools

SDGs: 

GOAL 4: Quality Education
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals

IGF 2019 Accountable development, purchase and use of IoT

DC: 

Dynamic Coalition on the Internet of Things

Round Table - Circle - 90 Min

Description: 

While IoT development and deployment continues to expand and grow, it is also welcome that there are more and more actors in the world seeking ways forward that will allow it to do so in a responsible manner. With IoT becoming all pervasive, and increasingly a key part of our critical infrastructures, taking ethical considerations into account from the outset has become key. A precondition for responsible IoT is that it is "secure enough" to be used responsibly. The DC IoT is currently exploring what "ethical considerations" have to be taken into account, and what can be done to come to a base-level approach for further secure roll-out and use of IoT devices, that can be trusted to be used for their purpose, and not to harm their users, or the security and stability of the Internet, itself. During the IGF session, the focus will be on the following themes: 1- What ethical considerations are important for development, deployment and use of IoT, in order to ensure that we are creating sustainable solutions with IoT? Aspects to be considered range from affordability and deployability where needed, to transparency of choice; clarity on data sharing and protection of privacy; 2- What prerequisites are important from a security perspective, to ensure that IoT can be trusted not to be harmful to its users, nor the wider Internet; for example by, for example, being weaponised as a tool for DDOS attacks. 3- Looking ahead – which issues will become relevant in the future for IoT development today”. This provides an open microphone for new issues to tackle in the context of future use of IoT. The workshop will be run as an open workshop in which all participants are welcome to contribute. A number of key participants from different stakeholder groups will be invited to contribute to the discussion as "committed contributors", for brief thematic statement to which questions and reactions will be invited. Provisional agenda for the workshop: 1 - Opening by Maarten Botterman, Chairman of the DC IoT; welcoming participants and explaining the rationale behind the work of the DC IoT and the intent of the workshop; 2 - Moderated discussion with a limited number of "committed contributors", moderated by Avri Doria. Contributions will be provided by the Internet Society; the World Economic Forum; government officials involved in national initiatives; Google and others to be confirmed); 3 - Draft conclusions by rapporteur and chair, and closure.

Organizers: 

Maarten Botterman, GNKS Consult BV Wolfgang Kleinwaechter, University of Arhus, GCSC Avri Doria, Technicalities Dan Caprio, The Providence Group Nigel Hickson, ICANN Peter Koch, DENIC

Speakers: 

Chair: Maarten Botterman Moderator: Avri Doria, Technicalities Rapporteur: Ryan Triplette, Canary Global Strategic Speakers to be announced,including: government officials, Internet Society, World Economic Forum, Google, GFCE, ICANN, RIPE NCC, and others.

SDGs: 

GOAL 2: Zero Hunger
GOAL 3: Good Health and Well-Being
GOAL 6: Clean Water and Sanitation
GOAL 7: Affordable and Clean Energy
GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities
GOAL 12: Responsible Production and Consumption
GOAL 13: Climate Action
GOAL 14: Life Below Water
GOAL 15: Life on Land
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals

IGF 2019 Community Networks: Policy and Regulations

DC: 

Dynamic Coalition on Community Connectivity (DC3)

Round Table - Circle - 90 Min

Description: 

Over the past 4 years, the Dynamic Coalition on Community Connectivity (DC3) has successfully demonstrated that Community Networks (CNs) are feasible options to expand connectivity and that the communities behind CNs are reliable partners. The sound research and engagement activity promoted by DC3 has aroused the attention of an incredibly wide range of actors, including the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) that co-sponsored the 2018 outcome, elaborated by DC3: the Community Network Manual: How to Build the Internet Yourself.

Besides the research demonstrating the feasibility and interest of CNs and instructions on how to build them, it is time to provide concrete suggestions for policymakers on how to facilitate CNs. To this extent, some DC3 members are elaborating the 2019 Annual Outcome documetn dedicated to Community Networks: A Collaborative Governance for Enabling Policies, based on the works developed by DC3 and its members over the past years, including the Declaration on Community Connectivity; the netCommons the Open letter to EU policy makers, the Declaration of the First Latin American Summit of Community Network, etc.

To discuss pros and cons of existing regulations and collect inputs from a wide range of stakeholders, a online consultation on the DC3 mailing list and a dedicated RightsCon session have been organiseds. The debate will allow participants to discuss policy and regulations and propose policy elements that will be presented at the IGF session to stimulate feedback of the IGF community.

The DRAFT outcome document analyse the following items: i) Definitions of CN and CN users; ii) License requirements and exemptions for CNs: iii) Spectrum policy; iv) Open-access to telecom infrastructures; v) Use of free software ; vi) Tax Exemptions for CNs; vii) Capacity building programmes

The IGF session will have the following agenda:

  • Introduction and presentation of DC3 and its work
  • Keynote remarks
  • Presentations of case studies
  • Discussion of the proposed policy elements
  • Discussion of next steps and priorities for DC3
Organizers: 

Luca Belli, FGV Law School

Speakers: 
  • Luca Belli, FGV Law School
  • Jane Coffin, ISOC
  • Sonia Jorge, Alliance for Affordable Internet (TBC)
  • Cristina Data, Ofcom (TBC)
  • Leandro Navarro, netCommons
  • Carlos Baca, Rhizomatica
  • Steve Song, Village Telco
  • Mélanie Dulong, CIS-CNRS
SDGs: 

GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities
GOAL 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities

IGF 2019 5G, IoT and Zero Rating Challenges for Net Neutrality

DC: 

Dynamic Coalition on Network Neutrality (DCNN)

Round Table - Circle - 90 Min

Description: 

In early 2019, two proposals emerged as most interesting net neutrality challenges to be explored by members of the Dynamic Coalition on Network Neutrality (DCNN), over 2019, in preparation to the IGF in Berlin: • So-called “network slicing” and the compatibility of 5G and the Internet of Things (IoT) with NN frameworks • The impact of zero rating of dominant social media on quality journalism and on elections Over the past years, DCNN members have produced substantial works and research on these issues, which have recently gained incredible prominence with regard to both political and developmental agendas. While 5G and the IoT are supposed to bring incredible changes to the way connectivity is provided and utilised, zero rating practices – with particular regard to the sponsoring of social media – are already determining an incredible impact on democracies around the world. Building on the DCNN 2018 outcome, the Zero Rating Map (available at www.zerorating.info ) and on the works developed by DCNN members, this session aim at exploring the impact that the most recent technological and commercial development are deploying and will deploy on Internet users’ capability to freely access and share innovation and information online and, ultimately, on the rights of every connected individual. The IGF session will have the following agenda: • Introduction and presentation of DCNN and its work • Presentations and debate on 5G and IoT • Presentations and debate on zero rating • Discussion of next steps and priorities for DCNN

Organizers: 

Luca Belli, FGV Law School

Speakers: 
  • Luca Belli, FGV Law School
  • Edison Lanza OAS rapporteur for Freedom of Expression
  • Frode Sorensen, Nkom 
  • Deji Olukotun, Sonos (TBC)
  • Lisa Felton, Vodafone Group (TBC)
  • Thomas Lohninger, Epicenter.works
  • Joana Varon, Coding Rights
SDGs: 

GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities

IGF 2019 How to balance children's right to play and to be protected.

DC: 

Dynamic Coalition on Child Online Safety

Round Table - U-shape - 90 Min

Description: 

Video content now constitutes 60% of all internet traffic and the proportion continues to grow. “Gaming is becoming a significant force in traffic volume as gaming downloads, Twitch streaming, and professional gaming go mainstream” (Sandvine Report, October, 2018) Estimates suggest that “7.8% of all internet traffic is linked to gaming , including downloads from major gaming networks (PlayStation Network, Xbox Live, Steam, Nintendo, etc.) as well as traffic from specific games. The actual “gaming” traffic on the network when downloads are included is likely higher than 7.8% due to marketplace downloads (ibid). Sales of games on physical formats such as DVDs have all but disappeared as gaming has become a distinct and important subset of global internet activity yet gaming has remained largely outside the scope of discussions on internet governance and the search for widely applicable standards which uphold universally recognised rights. The disappearance of physical formats e.g. the sale of DVDs has also resulted in the loss of a potential source of control or authority in relation to specified age limits for games as well as a loss of potential sources of advice and guidance e.g. from the sales staff in the shops. Children have a right to play (Art. 31, UN-CRC) and the online environment is now a key arena within which that right is exercised. The benefits to young people of being able to engage with the kind of rich environments which games can create seem to be indisputable. Yet there is a never- ending stream of reports about harms to children arising from online gaming. While games are designed to engage users there is little evidence of measures being taken to guard against excessive use. What care is being taken by games providers to ensure age inappropriate content or themes are not included in games which attract younger children? Parents are often not aware of the nature of the online environments which the games establish, where children interact and communicate with perhaps a great many other people they do not know and the children themselves do not know. What care is being taken to ensure malevolent individuals, paedophiles or bullies, are not being given easy access to children in environments where the possibility of parental supervision or support is, for practical purposes, either wholly non-existent or extremely limited? How should this be reflected against Art. 34 UN-CRC, protection from sexual abuse) What care is being taken to ensure gaming is not a soft introduction to or a pathway towards gambling? How are ever more immersive games likely to impact on the quality of children’s lives as augmented reality and virtual reality technologies continue to improve and become incorporated into larger numbers of games? Children’s gaming behaviour, their interaction with others, the duration of their usage, and the daytime of gaming activities are recorded when gaming online. How can it be ensured these data are not exploited for commercial purpose? Is enough being done to safeguard children from different forms of commercial exploitation (Art. 36 UN-CRC), including being exposed to advertising which they would not otherwise encounter because of regulatory limitations imposed in other environments? The Dynamic Coalition meeting will consider what governance mechanisms could be developed to draw the gaming industry into the discussions on children’s rights, in particular their right to play and their right to protection from inappropriate, illegal and bullying behaviours as well as their right to be protected from sexual abuse and commercial exploitation. Agenda 5 Min. Introduction to the theme 25 Min. Input from the speakers (5-7 Min each) 50 Min. Discussion with DC COS members and participants to the session 10 Min. Wrap up and conclusions Expected Outcome: Recommendations for politics and the private sector in regard of regulation and self-regulation measures in order to respect, protect and fulfil the rights of the child Recommendations for carers and parents in regard of respecting the rights of the child and enabling their children to cope with potential risk and harm

Organizers: 

Marie-laure Lemineur, ECPAT International

Speakers: 

Moderator: Jutta Croll, Digital Opportunities Foundation, Germany Speakers: 1-Ellen Blackler, Disney (tbc) 2-Emily Cashman Kirstein, Thorn 3-Clement Leong (aka “Stinky”), games developer, former professional gamer 4-Researcher in games and /or childhood development expert

SDGs: 

GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

IGF 2019 Data Governance on the Internet Space, by the Internet Model

DC: 

Dynamic Coalition on Core Internet Values

Round Table - U-shape - 90 Min

Description: 

The Round Table is to be organized to examine Data Issues from the perspective of Stability and Resilience, by the topic "Data Governance on the Internet Space, by the Internet Model" with a view to argue for a harmonized global IG approach to Data Governance.

Organizers: 

Sivasubramanian Muthusamy, Internet Society India Chennai Olivier Crepin-LeBlond, European AtLarge Organization.

Speakers: 

Vint Cerf, ARIN, (provisionally agreed, subject to schedule) Nigel Hickson, ICANN (confirmed) Marilyn Cade, CEO, mCADE llc, United States (confirmed) Jimson Olufuye PhD CEO Kontemporary, Africa ICT Alliance, Nigeria (confirmed) Thomas Ricket, Attorney at Law, Owner Rickert RA-GmbH, Germany (confirmed) Andrew Sullivan, CEO, Internet Society (invited) Rahul Gosain, Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology, India (invited) Fiona Alexander, NTIA (invited)

SDGs: 

GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals

IGF 2019 ICT accessibility for people with disability

DC: 

Dynamic Coalition on Accessibility and Disability

Round Table - U-shape - 90 Min

Description: 

Outline: DCAD is a resource in evaluating the online and onsite accessibility of each IGF through the lived experience of disability of its members. The DCAD session will discuss what has improved since the previous IGF meeting and strategies to work with the IGF Secretariat to make the IGF even more accessible in future. DCAD will liaise with other accessibility sessions at IGF and consider ways to work with other relevant DCs that should consider accessibility in their work. Draft agenda 1. Opening remarks and introduction to DCAD 2. Accessibility of IGF 2019 3. Liaison with accessibility sessions at IGF 2019 4. Future DCAD activities 5. Closing remarks Issues for discussion: Online and onsite accessibility of IGF meetings Liaison with IGF accessibility workshops Liaison with other DCs

Organizers: 

Andrea Saks, Coordinator of DCAD – ITU-T Gunela Astbrink, Women With Disabilities Australia

Speakers: 

Speakers: Derrick Cogburn, American University Shadi Abou-Zahra, W3C Gunela Astbrink, Women With Disabilities Australia Gerry Ellis, Feel The BenefIT Muhammad Shabbir, ISOC Islamabad Pakistan Chapter Deirdre Williams, Caribbean IGF member Judith Hellerstein, Founder/CEO of Hellerstein & Associates Eleonora Mazzucchi, IGF Secretariat Louis Bobo, Technical officer of IGF Secretariat Gent Bajrami, IT department of ITU-TSB Kaoru Mizuno, DCAD Secretariat, ITU-TSB Lidia Best Vice Chair EFHOH (following the captioning URL on mobile phone) Jorge Manhique, Disability Rights Fund and Disability Rights Advocacy Fund Patrick Ojok, Kyambogo University, Uganda Vashkar Bhattacharjee, Access to Information (a2i) Program of Bangladesh Nidhi Goyal, Rising Flame, India Moderator: Andrea Saks, Coordinator of DCAD – ITU-T Rapporteur Kaoru Mizuno, DCAD Secretariat – ITU-TSB

SDGs: 

GOAL 4: Quality Education
GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities
GOAL 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals

IGF 2019 IRPC Meeting- Sustainable Futures II

DC: 

Dynamic Coalition on Internet Rights and Principles

Birds of a Feather - Auditorium - 90 Min

Description: 

As smart cities and smart grids become part of urban planning and related R&D the relationship between these large scale infrastructures, which are based on internet access, and equipment built to manage 'big data' applications that collect and monitor consumer-uses, are linked to the protection and enjoyment of fundamental rights and freedoms online in ways that have, to date, not yet been fully considered as part of internet governance agendas. As the UN SDGs look to connect the next billion the relationship between recognition of emerging rights such as that of internet access and existing rights (e.g. the right to information, education) and the environmental burden of cloud computing services and data-processing requires our attention. Internet access as a sustainable development goal implies research and development of equipment, architectures, and services that are also environmentally sustainable in light of undertakings around Climate Change and the Sustainable Development Goals. The technical community and private sector have in this regard a key role in terms of where they choose to invest in data-centres, and other large infrastructures when working with both vulnerable communities and in environmentally sensitive areas. Objectives of the session: This session follows on from the DC meeting in Paris at the IGF 2018. The aim for this session is to decide upon a focus for next steps; e.g. specific rights for specific data-driven city design such as Smart meters; and consider ways to develop clear compliance mechanisms. A second aim is to connect these agendas in the Global North (e.g. Amsterdam, NYC, Barcelona, Berlin) to issues in data-driven city governance for the Global South in light of human rights standards as not only principles but also legal instruments. Agenda PART I 60-minute BoF discussion: Sustainable Futures II The session may not include any formal presentations, but will be structured as a moderated discussion around some main topics/questions. The confirmed participants will offer their insights on the raised topics. The open format will also offer the opportunity for any other participants to join the discussions. PART II IRPC Meeting - 30 mins Presentation of the Coalition work and ongoing projects Introduction new SC members Opening: IRPC Steering Commmittee elections process AOB and Q&A

Organizers: 

Minda Moreira, Internet Rights and Principles Coalition (IRPC)

Speakers: 

Speakers (provisional and TBCl) Rigobert Kenmogne, CS, Africa Hanane Boujemi, CS, WEOG June Parris, CS, GRULAC Additional Speakers: Representatives from Digital Cities Coalition, Government /CS, WEOG Representatives from the Technical Community Moderator: Marianne Franklin Rapporteur: Minda Moreira Online moderator: Representative of DCYouth (tbc)

SDGs: 

GOAL 1: No Poverty
GOAL 3: Good Health and Well-Being
GOAL 4: Quality Education
GOAL 5: Gender Equality
GOAL 7: Affordable and Clean Energy
GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities
GOAL 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities
GOAL 12: Responsible Production and Consumption
GOAL 13: Climate Action
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

IGF 2019 Public Access Contributions to Public Policy Success

DC: 

Dynamic Coalition on Public Access in Libraries (DC-PAL)

Round Table - Circle - 60 Min

Description: 

This session will look at how public access in libraries features in national broadband strategies designed to support digital inclusion. As neutral, welcoming public centres, libraries have a particular role in achieving both specific internet policy objectives and the Sustainable Development Goals more broadly. Alongside schools, libraries are noted as key venues not only for providing connectivity (as a stepping-stone towards, and a complement to, home connections), but also as places where people can develop digital skills and confidence. Women and other often marginalised groups have benefitted particularly from the possibilities offered by libraries.

Speakers will share experience of government programmes which have looked to realise this potential, describing both the logic for working with libraries, the potential to reach marginalised groups, and the achievements (both in terms of connectivity and positive side-effects) that were achieved.

This session will support the Dynamic Coalition on Public Access in Libraries’ 2019 report, focusing on broadband strategies and how libraries can support these.

Speakers:
• Emmanuel Muyomba, Rural Communications Development Fund, Uganda Communications Commission - government support for libraries
• Mahmoud Khalifa (Egypt, academic) – connectivity in library laws
• Teddy Woodhouse (A4AI) – libraries and public access in affordability strategies
• Paul Kiage, Assistant Director, Universal Service Fund (USF) of the Communications Authority of Kenya - Utilising USF for public access through libraries
• Stuart Hamilton, Electronic Information for Libraries (EIFL) - libraries at the heart of development policies

Organizers: 

Stephen Wyber, International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions
Stuart Hamilton, Electronic Information for Libraries

Speakers: 

Stephen Wyber, International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions

SDGs: 

GOAL 1: No Poverty
GOAL 2: Zero Hunger
GOAL 3: Good Health and Well-Being
GOAL 4: Quality Education
GOAL 5: Gender Equality
GOAL 6: Clean Water and Sanitation
GOAL 7: Affordable and Clean Energy
GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities
GOAL 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities
GOAL 12: Responsible Production and Consumption
GOAL 13: Climate Action
GOAL 14: Life Below Water
GOAL 15: Life on Land
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals

IGF 2019 Platform Values: Conflicting Rights, AI and Tax Avoidance

DC: 

Dynamic Coalition on Platform Responsibility

Debate - Auditorium - 90 Min

Description: 

Platform regulations are having enormous impact on the lives of several billion individuals, and this impact is poised to increase over the next decade. This session will three of the most crucial points of contention with regard to values underlying the operation of digital platforms: the dispute resolution mechanisms they design and the ways such mechanisms are structured to deal with conflicting rights and principles; the values that can or should be baked into platforms’ automated decision-making and the rights of appropriation in relation to the development of artificial intelligent systems; and the tax avoidance strategies that are frequently pursued by tech giants to minimise their fiscal responsibility across the multiple jurisdictions in which they provide their services.

This session will include presentations based on the papers featured in the special issue of the Computer Law & Security Review, celebrating five years of activities of the UN IGF Coalition on Platform Responsibility and dedicated to Platform Values: Conflicting Rights, Artificial Intelligence and Tax Avoidance. The special issue, which is the 2019 official outcome of the coalition, will include also the finalised Best Practices on Platforms' Implementation on the Right to Effective Remedy, elaborated by the coalition between May 2018 and March 2019.  

Over the first years of activity, the Coalition has explored the role of digital platforms as gateways to speech, innovation and value creation; it has highlighted that their ascendance as central elements of our society, economy, and public sphere is redefining the concepts of “private” and “public”, and challenging conventional approaches to regulation and governance. Along those lines, the special issue starts from the consideration that, to guarantee the balance and sustainability of governance systems, the exercise of power should be constrained. To do so, a deliberative process over the aims, mechanisms and boundaries of regulation is needed. Accordingly, when private entities rise to the level of quasi-sovereigns or private regulators, it is natural to expect discussion, shared understanding and scrutiny of the choices and trade-offs embedded in their private ordering. In this perspective, the papers featured in the special issue provide analyses and putting forward concrete solutions and policy proposals with regard to platform values. This call is therefore aimed at papers analysing conflicting rights, artificial intelligence systems and tax avoidance strategies with regard to digital platforms. Particularly, the call targets analyses regarding:

 The IGF session will have the following agenda:

  •          Introduction and presentation of the coalition and its work
  •          Brief presentation of the Best Practices 
  •          Presentations of the contributions to the special issue
  •          Discussion of next steps and priorities for the coalition
Organizers: 

Nicolo Zingales, Sussex University

Speakers: 

· Nicolo Zingales, Sussex University
· Luca Belli, FGV Law School
· Paul Nemitz, European Commission TBC
· Monica Rosina, Facebook TBC
· Catherine Coarnovale, Elsevir
· Ian Brown, RIA Africa
· Katya Semenova, HSE-Skolkovo Institute for Law and Development
· Rolf Weber, University of Zurich

SDGs: 

GOAL 12: Responsible Production and Consumption

IGF 2019 Connecting the Dots from Data to Policy Takeaways

DC: 

Dynamic Coalition on Innovative Approaches to Connecting the Unconnected

Round Table - U-shape - 60 Min

Description: 

This year's dynamic coalition session on innovative approaches to connecting the unconnected seeks to build on three previous years of active engagement at the Internet Governance Forum. In 2016, we introduced the first effort to systematically gather data on innovative approaches to connecting the unconnected. In 2017, we invited grassroots organizations to speak from their communities to provide a personal flavor to the nature of these projects, and understand at the grassroots, the challenges that exist. Last year, in 2018, we introduced cost data on a 100+ case studies, synthesizing them for data on cost per beneficiary per year, and providing key insights to policy makers and project implementers on the effectiveness of innovative approaches to connecting underserved communities. This data added to a robust community discussion on metrics and how governments view such data, and our session last year enabled perspectives from new governmental voices at the Internet governance forum including from Afghanistan and South Africa. This year, we seek to build on the momentum by introducing synthesis papers by domain (health, education, agriculture, financial inclusion) through community-driven work that we have been doing through in-depth interviews with multiple stakeholders. These studies seek to distill key takeaways for implementation Further, we seek to talk about the data available on new technologies on the supply side, especially fixed wireless work that has seen a recent emergence in the US and forms four of our more recent case studies. Finally, we hope to present regional synthesis papers for policy makers to engage in robust discussion on priorities in their regions. The session will trace the arc of the coalition's work, and yield concrete outputs to feed into ongoing work in different areas, including financing for connectivity, digital skills principles coordination, mhealth and ehealth practices, and internet connectivity for agricultural uses.

Organizers: 

Christopher Yoo, Co-Convener, University of Pennsylvania Rajan Mathews, Co-Convener, Cellular Operators Association of India Michael Kende, Co-Convener, Graduate Institute, Geneva, Helani Galpaya, Co-Convener, LIRNEAsia Sharada Srinivasan, University of Pennsylvania Muge Haseki, University of Pennsylvania

Speakers: 

We are still in discussion with speakers for participation in the session, so our speaker list is to be considered preliminary. As with last year, we are hoping to include new and diverse voices to a robust discussion. We are hoping to include speakers from: 1. The World Economic Forum's Digital Economy and Society initiative (Derek O' Halloran/Eric White) 2. The World Bank-led Digital Development Partnership (Samia Melhem/Doyle Gallegos) 3. GSMA (Dominique Lazanski/Belinda Exelby) 3. Government representatives (India/Nepal/Rwanda - we will additionally reach out to participants from countries that are engaged in policy implementation and experimentation in relation to access, to solicit their participation) 4. Grassroots projects (We have invited case study participants from Nepal, South Africa, Sri Lanka and Portugal to the IGF) 5. Additionally, we also hope to reach out to the ISOC and IEEE policy communities to solicit their participation in the session.

SDGs: 

GOAL 1: No Poverty
GOAL 3: Good Health and Well-Being
GOAL 4: Quality Education
GOAL 5: Gender Equality
GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals

Reference Document: http://1worldconnected.org/

IGF 2019 Importance of Universal Acceptance to Governments

DC: 

Dynamic Coalition on Domain Name System Issues

Round Table - Circle - 90 Min

Description: 

Universal Acceptance (UA) is a driver of Internet inclusion. The goal of the Dynamic Coalition on DNS Issues (DC-DNSI) in 2019 is to help accelerate UA-readiness.

The DC session in Berlin will provide participants with an overview of the DC’s work in its first year, discussion of public sector case studies on UA, an opportunity to exchange best practices on UA-readiness, and pointers for how to engage governments on the issue of UA-readiness. The DC will also address prospective work for IGF2020.

The DC-DNSI held its inaugural session at the IGF2018 in Paris and has held regular meetings, both virtual and in-person (during MAG meetings) on a monthly basis. A description of the DC-DNSI, its Goal, Objectives, and Work Plan, as well as meeting minutes, are available at : https://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/content/dynamic-coalition-on-dn...

Issue
How to effectively encourage governments to become Universal Acceptance-ready.

Format and participants
The DC-DNSI organizing team believes that a roundtable format is the most conducive to facilitating a discussion amongst stakeholders about the benefits, hurdles, and existing experiences regarding Universal Acceptance-readiness in the public sector.

Draft agenda
10 minutes – Welcome & Introduction
5 minutes – Lightning Talk 1 (DC-DNSI representative)
5 minutes – Lightning Talk 2 (governmental representative)
50 minutes – Moderated Round Table Discussion
20 minutes -- Conclusion

Aims

● Raise awareness about Universal Acceptance, IDN implementation, and the work of the DC-DNSI.
● Share global success stories and adoption of UA terms in Govt procurement process for UA readiness.
● Encourage readiness for Universal Acceptance and IDN implementation by increasing awareness to enable more end users to use the Internet.
● Discuss the (potential) impact of readiness for Universal Acceptance globally and in different regions.
○ e.g. North America and Western Europe may care more about new gTLDs than non-ASCII script TLDs
○ Bringing the next billion online (cultural and economic impact)
● Improve understanding of and responsiveness to new technologies and standards by engaging with industry, academia, standards development organizations, and other relevant parties (even if the technology and standards we are discussing in the context of Universal Acceptance are not that new at all)

Outcomes

● Understand: How the DC-DNSI and other bodies can engage more effectively and in greater cooperation across different policy and standards development bodies to raise awareness about Universal Acceptance and IDN Implementation.
● Learn: If readiness for Universal Acceptance is not the agenda of public sector bodies, how can we change that?
● Learn: Which are the barriers for Universal Acceptance and IDN implementation in public sector bodies?
● Discuss: Can Universal Acceptance and IDN implementation be covered by directives on the accessibility of the websites and mobile applications of public sector bodies and/or future public procurement standards?

Organizers: 

Dynamic Coalition on DNS Issues; Universal Acceptance Steering Group; ICANN

Speakers: 

Key speakers will include representatives from at least two different governments, as well as private sector UA experts, and members of the UASG and DC-DNSI.

Manal Ismail, NTRA; Ram Mohan, Afilias; Sarmad Hussein, ICANN; German government official.

Moderator - Susan Chalmers, NTIA
Rapporteur - Dennis Tan Tanaka, Verisign

SDGs: 

GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities

Reference Document: https://uasg.tech/

IGF 2019 Strengthening the Future for Small Island Developing States

DC: 

Dynamic Coalition on Small Island Developing States in the Internet Economy

Round Table - U-shape - 90 Min

Description: 

The DC-SIDS has been engaging in several activities through its individual territories and regions since the Inaugural Meeting in the 2018 IGF.

In the Caribbean, several countries have already held and/or are planning their IGFs and the Caribbean IGF will be held in Trinidad & Tobago from May 2-3, 2019 with additional Caribbean specific events in the margins. See https://www.ctu.int/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/15th-CIGF-Overview.pdf and https://www.ctu.int/event/30th-anniversary-celebration/ for more.

The Pacific region is also in the midst of planning its 2019 events.

In this regard, the 2019 IGF in Berlin will mark a unique opportunity for the SIDS to assemble and to report on their activities, noting that the Host Country Government is offering global NRI representatives support to travel to and participate in the activities in Berlin in November.

AGENDA

- Welcome and Introduction
- Formal Presentation of 2018 IGF Inaugural Meeting of the DC-SIDS Report
- Report from SIDS on local IG-related activities in 2019 (including NRIs)
- Review of online discussions re: DC-SIDS Action Plan
- Formal adoption of DC-SIDS Action Plan
- Formation of Sub-Committees to implement Action Plan
- Any Other Business

Organizers: 

Tracy Hackshaw - Trinidad & Tobago Multistakeholder Advisory Group / Internet Society Trinidad & Tobago Chapter; Maureen Hilyard, Pacific Islands Chapter of the Internet Society / ICANN At Large Advisory Committee (ALAC)

Speakers: 

Session Chairs:

Tracy Hackshaw, Trinidad & Tobago Multistakeholder Advisory Group
Maureen Hilyard, PICISOC / ICANN ALAC

Roundtable format of meeting and Agenda does not lend itself to identifying Speakers at this time.

SDGs: 

GOAL 1: No Poverty
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities
GOAL 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities
GOAL 13: Climate Action
GOAL 15: Life on Land

IGF 2019 Dynamic Coalition on Gender and Internet Governance Main Ses

DC: 

Dynamic Coalition on Gender and Internet Governance

Round Table - Circle - 90 Min

Description: 

The Dynamic Coalition on Gender and Internet Governance (DC GIG) works towards integrating gender into the internet governance space and bring in the diverse perspectives of women and queer and trans persons. A session dedicated to the DC GIG, the intersection of gender and internet governance is crucial to the larger conversation on digital inclusion.

The Gender Report Cards from the 2017 IGF revealed that only 41% of the participants were women. 45 out of 81 sessions had no engagement with gender, about 50% of the speakers were women, and less than 50% of the total number of moderators were women. The Gender Report Cards themselves were filled in only for 40% of the sessions. When we speak about digital inclusion, it is very important to start the conversation from the IGF spaces themselves. The DC GIG session imperative for this.

This session will also be a space to discuss other barriers to which restrict women and queer and trans persons access to technology and internet and their effective use of the space. This includes technology-enabled violence, privacy, surveillance, and the influence of algorithms and artificial intelligence, which are also some of the key emerging issues at the intersection of gender, sexuality, internet governance, and technology. Discussions around digital security and privacy in the age of data and algorithmic decision-making, and technology-enabled violence, through a gender and sexuality lens is crucial in this dialogue. It will take into account the current sociopolitical climate prevalent in various countries, and the increasing clamp down on digital rights, dissent, and freedom of expression in the online space.

Every year at the global IGF and at some of the other regional IGFs, Gender Report Cards are filled in for each of the workshops and sessions which take place at the Forum. Gender Report Cards are a mechanism used to determine the gender diversity and relevance of gender at workshops at an Internet Governance Forum. We will be presenting the results from the past years and discussing the main outcomes which will help us track progress from one forum to another, and also determine areas which require more work, both from those in the Dynamic Coalition as well as others working at the intersection of gender, internet and technology.
The DC GIG session will examine the need and ways to further expand the purview of gender in the context of internet governance and the IGF and actively include queer and trans persons, especially from global south economies. It is particularly essential to have this diversity when we discuss emerging issues in the larger gamut of digital rights and internet governance.

To facilitate a space of sharing perspectives and learnings, the session will be in the form of a roundtable. There will be speakers who have worked at the intersection of gender, sexuality, and technology who will input from their work with diverse demographics, as well as bring to light the specific challenges which they face.

One of the main outcomes will be the presentation of the results from the Gender Report Cards from the past IGFs. This will be directly indicative of areas which need work in the internet governance and IGF spaces. Discussion of emerging issues from a gender and sexuality perspective as well as sharing of knowledge from different economies will be set pace for the work to be done in the coming year, both by the DC as well as in collaboration with other DCs.

This session will be live tweeted so that the learnings from the session are also publicly captured and available. This would be a more accessible way to take the conversation forward, both immediately as well as on a longer run.

Organizers: 

Bishakha Datta - Point of View, India
Smita Vanniyar - Point of View, India
Baldeep Grewal - Universität Würzburg, Germany

Speakers: 

Vidushi Marda - Article 19
Valentina Pellizer - Association for Progressive Communications
Baldeep Grewal - Universität Würzburg, Germany
Subha Wijesiriwardena - Women and Media Collective, Sri Lanka

SDGs: 

GOAL 5: Gender Equality

IGF 2019 Capacity Building for Better Blockchain Governance

DC: 

Dynamic Coalition on Blockchain Technologies

Break-out Group Discussions - Flexible Seating - 90 Min

Description: 

In this session, the Dynamic Coalition on Blockchain Technologies invites you to participate in an interactive discussion and strategy creation session for capacity building around blockchain technology and explore the connection between broad capacity building and the potential for better blockchain governance. After an initial explanation of the intended process and goals, session participants will break out into small discussion groups. Led by group facilitators, the discussion groups will engage in a design sprint exercise in which they design potential methods for capacity building among the general public to enable greater understanding of and interaction with blockchain technology. The groups will then report out to the larger group, and then rotate for a second iteration on a prior group's design. Thus, a total of two design sprints will be undertaken by each group. The goal of the session is to produce concrete proposals that the DC membership can build out over the next year in order to deepen our connection with the broader IGF community, increase blockchain technology capacity among the general public, and ultimately contribute to better blockchain governance.

Organizers: 

Carla L. Reyes, Michigan State University College of Law & Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University
Primavera de Filippi, CNRS & Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University
Constance Choi, CNRS & COALA

Speakers: 

Carla L. Reyes, Michigan State University College of Law & Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, Moderator

In light of the below description of the session, we are still working to recruit other moderators. The goal will be to facilitate small working-group discussions to generate ideas for intersectional activity around capacity building in the blockchain technology space. We anticipate that both volunteers from the DC membership and outside participants will act as mini-discussion moderators. Carla Reyes will act only as a facilitator of the overall session. Each table will have a rapporteur as well so that we can bring together all the discussion for the final outputs from the session. This session format is novel for us at IGF, so we don't yet have all the moderators confirmed.

SDGs: 

GOAL 4: Quality Education
GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 12: Responsible Production and Consumption