Submitted Proposals


Organization: Council of Europe
Title :
32. Dignity, security and privacy of children on the Internet applying international law to protect their best interests
Provide a concise formulation for the proposed workshop theme including its importance and relevance to the IGF.

The aim of this workshop is to discuss whether, and how, it is possible to provide legal remedies globally to protect the rights of children on the Internet.The workshop will consider the UN Convention of the Rights of the Child, written in a pre-Internet age, and consider its relevance today.

The workshop will look at whether such Conventions and other texts, such as the Council of Europe Declaration on protecting the dignity, security and privacy of children on the Internet, can work effectively outside legal frameworks (e.g. by considering the signatories to the Convention, the work undertaken since then and the reporting/evaluation procedures).

The Council of Europe Declaration (signed by 47 European states) on protecting the dignity, security and privacy of children on the Internet stressed that “(…) other than in the context of law enforcement, there should be no lasting or permanently accessible record of the content created by children on the Internet which challenges their dignity, security and privacy or otherwise renders them vulnerable now or at a later stage in their lives.”

Is there a technical solution that can be offered to ensure there is ‘no lasting or permanently accessible record’ of material put up by children and what are the legal, criminal and economic ramifications?

Bearing in mind the inherent right for children to dignity and to protection against all forms of discrimination or arbitrary or unlawful interference with their privacy and to unlawful attacks on their honour and reputation, the objectives of the workshop will be to examine the extent to which international law can and should protect but also promote children’s well being on the Internet so that they may rely on it as an essential tool for their everyday activities (communication, information, knowledge, entertainment, commercial transactions).

In this connection, the effectiveness of relevant international legal instruments (including those listed above but also instruments such as the UNESCO Convention on the protection and promotion of the diversity of cultural expressions, the Council of Europe Convention against the sexual exploitation and abuse of children and the Convention on Cybercrime) will be considered in relation to three key rights:

-          the rights of minors to protection,

-          the right for everyone  to express and inform themselves freely 

-          and the right for the Internet industry to commerce.  

The workshop, working with a variety of stakeholders on the panel and in the audience, will seek to examine whether or not these instruments are sufficient and whether they should be supplemented or replaced to increase their effectiveness.   

Outline Agenda:

1. Opening and setting out the areas for consideration: Ms Andrea Gita Millwood Hargrave, Associate, University of Oxford, UK (5 mins)

2. Panellists debate: what is dignity, security and privacy for children on the Internet, and are we succeeding to protect and foster all three elements? (15 mins)

-Academic/civil society perspective: Divina Frau Meigs, International Association for Media and Communication Research, Professor, University of Sorbonnne, France / Krishna Reddy, Associate Professor, Media Politics, Osmania University, India

- State perspective: Michael Truppe, Federal Chancellery, Austria

- Media perspective: Khalid Hadadi, BBC EU and International Policy

3. Open debate: can we all agree on protecting children’s dignity, security and protection to the same level? (25 mins)

4. Panellists debate: what are the barriers to the same level of protection? (15 mins)

- Security/technical perspectives: Marco Gercke, University of Cologne, Germany / Yves Poullet, University of Namur, Belgium / Carlos Gregorio, Privacy expert, Latin America

- Business perspective: Marco Pancini, European policy counsel, Google

5. Open debate: Is there an optimum solution(s) for harmonised levels of dignity, security and privacy of children on the Internet? What is the likely ‘buy-in’ across nations? (25 mins)

6. Wrap up by the moderator: conclusions, proposed solutions, messages and reporting back (5 mins)  

Provide the names and affiliations of the panellists you are planning to invite. Describe the main actors in the field and whether you have you approached them about their willingness to participate in proposed workshop.
  • Divina Frau Meigs, International Association for Media and Communication Research, Professor, University of Sorbonnne, France

  • Marco Gercke, University of Cologne, Germany
  • Carlos Gregorio, Privacy expert, Latin America

  • Khalid Hadadi, BBC EU and International Policy

  • Andrea Gita Millwood Hargrave, Associate, University of Oxford, UK (5 mins)

  • Yves Poullet, University of Namur, Belgium

  • Krishna Reddy, Associate Professor, Media Politics, Osmania University, India

  • Michael Truppe, Federal Chancellery, Austria

  • Marco Pancini, European policy counsel, Google

     

Provide the name of the organizer(s) of the workshop and their affiliation to various stakeholder groups. Describe how you will take steps to adhere to the multi-stakeholder principle, including geographical diversity.

The Council of Europe will organise the workshop and proposes that it be co-organised by the International Association for Media and Communication Research.

The Council of Europe will organise the workshop and ensure that it reflects geographical diversity and multi-stakeholder interests. Gender - which forms a key element of its human rights work and standards - will also be reflected in the discussions.

Does the proposed workshop provide different perspectives on the issues under discussion?
By bringing together the actual experiences of users with policy makers and industry, the workshop will be able to build on the expertise represented by the different sectors and perspectives. These include those of youth, education, industry (technical, commercial and compliance), media and International organisations.
Please explain how the workshop will address issues relating to Internet governance and describe how the workshop conforms with the Tunis Agenda in terms of substance and the mandate of the IGF.

This workshop relates to the openness of the Internet, including the "freedom to seek, receive, impart and use information, in particular for the creation, accumulation and dissemination of knowledge (...) and to protect and respect (...) privacy" (para 41 Tunis Agenda). In this connection, it relates to the "positive uses" of the Internet (para 43 Tunis Agenda) and the management of the Internet by everyday users, with particular reference to young people.

The workshop also seeks to address the need to "build confidence and security in the use of ICTs by strengthening the trust framework" (para 39 Tunis Agenda). It also impacts on the issue of access to the Internet (content and services) and the develoment of public policy regarding the Internet. It also relates equally with the Tunis Agenda paras 42, 46, 52, 88, 90 (c), 90 (n), 90 (o) and fulfils much of the IGF mandate pursuant to para 72 of the Tunis Agenda.   

List similar events you and/or any other IGF workshops you have organized in the past.

The Council of Europe organised an open forum on protecting children on the Internet (report will be submitted shortly).  

Were you part of organizing a workshop last year? Which one? Did you submit a workshop report?
Together with the EBU, WBU, IFJ and the BBC, the Council of Europe co-organised the IGF workshop on “Quality and the Internet – using and trusting Internet content  (report submitted).  The Council of Europe also organised an open forum on the public service value of the Internet (report will be submitted shortly) Together with United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) and the Association for Progressive Communications (APC), the Council of Europe co-organised a best practice forum on  “Public participation in Internet Governance: Emerging Issues, good practices and proposed solutions” (report submitted) Together with UNESCO and OSCE, the Council of Europe co-organised the workshop on “Freedom of expression as a security issue” (report will be submitted shortly). The Council of Europe also organised a best practice forum on the “Cybercrime convention” (report will be submitted shortly). Together with cyberlaw Asia, the Council of Europe organised a workshop on “Legislative responses to current and future cyber-threats” (report will be submitted shortly)