Submitted Proposals


Organization: Council of Europe
Title :
15. Delivering universal access and public value of the Internet: a goal of national information policy
Provide a concise formulation for the proposed workshop theme including its importance and relevance to the IGF.

Delivering universal access and public value of the Internet: a goal of national information. policy

Internet governance: ex post or ex ante? Just assigned names and numbers or something more? Should we wait and see how Internet will develop, and then act to eliminate deficiencies and maximize the individual and public benefits it can deliver, or can we be wise before the event? Moreover, should we allow events that seriously hamper or block access to the Internet for a large number of users over a significant period of time.

These are some of the issues to be discussed during this workshop. We rely on the Internet as an essential tool for their everyday activities (communication, information, knowledge, commercial transactions). The Internet and other ICTs can deliver even more public value when they contribute to development and poverty reduction (as a contribution to the Milennium Development Goals). Ultimately, they can enhance the exercise and enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms.

The question therefore becomes: how can Internet governance ensure and/or facilitate the delivery of the tools and services for our everyday activities which improve our basic quality of life? What role for governments, the private sector and civil society, and what public-private partnerships can be struck? Are current arrangements for Internet governance adequate to this task? Another question is: can this, as well as the educational and cultural role of the Internet (including its multilingualism and multiculturalism) be guaranteed by exclusively commercial use of the Internet?

National information policies including a comprehensive national and local strategy designed both to ensure universal access to the Internet (inter alia by promoting information literacy) needs to be developed and implemented, in particular in areas with a low communication and information infrastructure, and to make sure that it delivers full public value. Information policy should also provide for redressing market failure, where market forces are unable to satisfy all legitimate needs, both in terms of infrastructure and of the range and quality of available content.

The workshop will also cover, among other things, the integration of ICTs into education and promoting media and information literacy and training in formal and non-formal education sectors for children and adults.

The aim of this workshop is to consider and discuss best practices for the promotion of and strategies for effective access to Internet content and services which is language and culture specific, and of information policy frameworks and development policies best serving these goals.

Agenda:

1. Opening and setting the scene by the moderator: Mr Thomas Schnieder, OFCOM, Switzerland

2. What do we consider are the key/core public value elements and benefits of the Internet which improve the quality of our lives, and who are/should be responsible for them?

     a. Business perspectives, in particular Public-Private Partnership (PPP) and Partnership for Technology access (PTA): Mr Nabil Chebbi, Microsoft

     b. Government perspectives: Mr Michael Truppe, Federal Chancellery Austria   

    c. Civil society/academia perspectives: Mr Biswajit Das, Centre for Culture, Media and Governance, Jamia Millia Central University, India

3. What are the worst and best case scenarios for the Internet with and without a public value core?

    a. Market failure, including the failure of the Internet to provide access to core Internet services and tools - Karol Jakubowicz, Chairman, Information for all Programme (IFAP) / UNESCO

    b. Media and information literacy - Divina Frau Meigs, International Association for Media and Communication Research, Professor, University of Sorbonnne, France

    c. Internet for Improving Public Service Delivery - Haiyan Qian, Knowledge Management Branch, DPADM, UNDESA

4. What can be done to mainstream the public value of the Internet?

    a. National information policies - Karol Jakubowicz, Chairman, Information for all Programme (IFAP) / UNESCO

    b. Government transformation - Haiyan Qian, Knowledge Management Branch, DPADM, UNDESA

    c. Effective access to the Internet which is language and culturally specific / multilingualism - Karol Jakubowicz, Chairman, Information for all Programme (IFAP) / UNESCO

    d. media perspectives: Giacomo Mazzone, European Broadcasting Union.

5. Wrap up: conclusions, messages and reporting back

Provide the names and affiliations of the panellists you are planning to invite. Describe the main actors in the field and whether you have you approached them about their willingness to participate in proposed workshop.

  • Nabil Chebbi, Microsoft
  • Michael Truppe, Federal Chancellery Austria
  • Thomas Schneider, Ofcom, Switzerland Biswajit Das, Centre for Culture, Media and Governance, Jamia Millia Central University, India
  • Karol Jakubowicz, Chairman, Information for all Programme (IFAP) / UNESCO
  • Divina Frau Meigs, International Association for Media and Communication Research, Professor, University of Sorbonnne, France
  • Haiyan Qian, Knowledge Management Branch, DPADM, UNDESA
  • Giacomo Mazzone, European Broadcasting Union
Provide the name of the organizer(s) of the workshop and their affiliation to various stakeholder groups. Describe how you will take steps to adhere to the multi-stakeholder principle, including geographical diversity.

The workshop will be organised by the Council of Europe in co-operation with the Information for All Programme (IFAP) / UNESCO (proposed) and the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA).

Does the proposed workshop provide different perspectives on the issues under discussion?
The workshop will ensure different perspectives are put forward. The co-organisers by the very nature of their work and remit will bring together different expertise, experiences and views. 
Please explain how the workshop will address issues relating to Internet governance and describe how the workshop conforms with the Tunis Agenda in terms of substance and the mandate of the IGF.
Access to Internet for all is a central element to a people-centred, development-oriented and non-discriminatory Information society (para 31 Tunis Agenda). This includes access which is language (even dialect) specific as part of the multilinguilisation of the Internet (para 53 of the Tunis Agenda) and to the promotion of the use of traditional and new media in order to foster access to information, culture and knowledge for all people and using, inter alia, radio and television as education and learning tools (para 90n)). In these connections, the workshop relates directly with "Implications for development policy". The WSIS encouraged governments to elaborate, as appropriate, comprehensive, forward-looking and sustainable national e-strategies, including ICT strategies and sectoral e-strategies, as an integral part of national development plans and poverty reduction strategies, as soon as possible and before 2010 (para. 85 of the Tunis Agenda).
List similar events you and/or any other IGF workshops you have organized in the past.
The Council of Europe organised a best practice forum on the public service value of the Internet (report not yet submitted).
Were you part of organizing a workshop last year? Which one? Did you submit a workshop report?
Together with the EBU, WBU, IFJ and the BBC, the Council of Europe co-organised the IGF workshop on “Quality and the Internet – using and trusting Internet content  (workshop report submitted).  The Council of Europe also organised an open forum on the public service value of the Internet (report not yet submitted) Together with APC Women's Networking Support Programme (APC WNSP) (Civil Society), EuroISPA: Pan-European association of the Internet services providers (Industry), the Council of Europe co-organised the IGF workshop “Content regulation and the duty of states to protect fundamental human rights” (workshop report submitted). Together with United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) and the Association for Progressive Communications (APC), the Council of Europe co-organised a best practice forum on  “Public participation in Internet Governance: Emerging Issues, good practices and proposed solutions” (workshop report submitted) Together with UNESCO and OSCE, the Council of Europe co-organised the workshop on “Freedom of expression as a security issue” (report not yet submitted). The Council of Europe also organised an open forum on “Protecting children on the Internet” (workshop report not submitted), a best practice forum on the “Cybercrime convention” (report not yet submitted). Together with cyberlaw Asia, the Council of Europe organised a workshop on “Legislative responses to current and future cyber-threats” (report not yet submitted)