IGF 2017 WS #61 Between a rock and a hard place?: Identifying encryption policies that are human rights respecting

Short Title: 

What does a rights respecting encryption policy look like?

Proposer's Name: Ms. Sheetal Kumar
Proposer's Organization: Global Partners Digital
Co-Proposer's Name: Mr. Richard Wingfield
Co-Proposer's Organization: Global Partners Digital
Co-Organizers:
Ms.,Sheetal,KUMAR,Civil Society,Global Partners Digital
Mr.,Richard,WINGFIELD,Civil Society, Global Partners Digital

Additional Speakers: 

No other speakers have been added but all the original ones have been confirmed:

Agenda: 

Why: This workshop will build on the outcomes of an IGF session debate in 2016 entitled "On cybersecurity: Who has got our back?". During that session proposal, one of the key outcomes and requests of participants was that there is a need for more guidance on how encryption policy can be human rights respecting. This session will provide participants with the ability to critically assess existing encryption-related policies against human rights standards and is equally divided between a moderated panel discussion with experts and an interactive, hands-on session for participants.

20 minutes: A moderated discussion with experts

Four experts (see below) will provide their perspectives on the interplay between encryption and human rights for 3-5 minutes each.

15 minutes: Interactive analysis in break-out groups

All participants will then break out into groups. They will be asked to analyse a piece of legislation or policy and provide recommendations on how to improve it.

20 minutes: Sharing insights in plenary

Each group will be asked to present their analysis and take questions from the other participants.

5 minutes: Wrap up and next steps

A short wrap-up will summarise findings and explain what next steps, including any concrete outputs/materials that will follow the session that summarise findings, which be distributed.

 

 


Session Format: Other - 60 Min
Format description: This session will combine a panel (total of 15 minutes) and a break-out format (remaining 45 minutes).

Proposer:
Country: United Kingdom
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Co-Proposer:
Country: United Kingdom
Stakeholder Group: Civil Society

Speaker: Alice Munyua
Speaker: Dominique Lazanski
Speaker: 'Gbenga Sesan
Speaker: Constance Bommelaer

Content of the Session:
Why: This workshop will build on the outcomes of an IGF session debate in 2016 entitled "On cybersecurity: Who has got our back?". During that session proposal, one of the key outcomes and requests of participants was that there is a need for more guidance on how encryption policy can be human rights respecting. This session will provide participants with the ability to critically assess existing encryption-related policies against human rights standards.

How: Four experts (see below) will provide their perspectives on the interplay between encryption and human rights for 3-5 minutes each. All participants will then break out into groups. They will be asked to analyse a piece of legislation or policy and provide recommendations on how to improve it. This discussion will last 10-15 minutes. Then each group will be asked to present their analysis and take questions from the other participants. By the end the participants will be able to critically evaluate encryption policies against human rights standards.

Relevance of the Session:
This session will explore the issue of encryption and the relationship between encryption-related policy and human rights. It relates to the main theme "shape your digital future" as it implies the need to take responsibility for the way digital technologies evolve and impact society. Encryption policy has broad implications for the development and use of the internet including security, trust and its sustainable growth. This session will support that theme by providing participants with concrete tools to be able to use in policymaking in order to uphold human rights online. The organisers aim to feed the outcomes of the best practices identified in this workshop into the IGF's intersessional work streams, including the potential set-up of an IGF best practice forum (BPF) on encryption.

Tag 1: Human Rights Online
Tag 2: Internet Economy
Tag 3: Cybersecurity Norms

Interventions:
'Gbenga Sesan is a prominent Nigerian digital rights activist who will be able to speak to the role that encryption plays in protecting human rights, including privacy and freedom of expression. He has played a key role in the evolution of an 'Internet Rights and Freedoms' bill in Nigeria.

Alice Munya has long-standing experience in internet governance and is well-acquainted with a variety of perspectives on a broad range of IG issues, including those which are technical in nature. In this workshop, she will present the perspectives and challenges faced by governments (in particular law enforcement) when it comes to encryption. Alice's experience stems from her position on the board of the Communications Commission of Kenya, the board of directors of the Kenya Network Information Centre (KeNIC) and as vice chair of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) Governmental Advisory Committee (GAC).

Constance Bommaeler is Senior Director of Global Internet Policy at The Internet Society and will present the views of technologists and the challenges they face with regards to encryption policy. ISOC occupies a unique role as a global organisation and network that promotes principles that are intended to persuade governments to make decisions that are right for their citizens. It is a leading organisation on policy and technology standards.

Finally, Dominique Lazanski works at the GSMA focusing on Internet governance and security and will be able to provide the views of the private sector, and in particular the mobile industry and the challenges it faces in protecting security and privacy as interconnected/networked devices and the internet of things are further integrated into daily life.

Diversity:
Each participant will present different perspectives: business, government/law enforcement, technologist and civil society and represent diversity in terms of stakeholder group (all four stakeholder groups are represented), gender (three of the speakers are women), and region (two of the speakers come from the global South, in particular the African continent).

Onsite Moderator: [email protected]
Online Moderator: [email protected]
Rapporteur: [email protected]

Online Participation:
A remote moderator will be in permanent contact with remote participants and update them on the progress of the session. Remote participants will be encouraged to feed into the discussion, and their comments and remarks will be fed back to the room to incorporate them in the discussion.
There will be a specific segment of the session dedicated to receiving questions from remote participants, to make sure they have opportunities to intervene and engage.


Discussion facilitation:
This format is designed to facilitate maximum participation and information sharing among participants, as well as the exchange of expertise on a highly topical and complex, evolving internet governance issue. The panel session which will be facilitated by the onsite moderator and will set out the differing perspectives on encryption policy and its human rights implications.

Following the panel discussion, a brief round of questions will be taken before participants break out into smaller groups, a format which facilitates discussion (see description for more information on the break-out aspect of the session). Each group will then nominate a rapporteur to report back to the wider group. The panel experts will also rotates around the groups to offer support and guidance while the break-out session takes place.

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: Yes
Link to Report: https://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/filedepot_download/4098/268