IGF 2018 WS #232 Big Data Governance for Paris Agreement & SDGs

Format: 

Panel - 60 Min

Subtheme: 

Organizer 1: CHANG LIU, Chinese Institute of Eletronics
Organizer 2: Ana Neves, Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia I.P.
Organizer 3: Simon Hodson, Committee on Data of the International Council for Science

Speaker 1: Chuang Liu, Civil Society, Asia-Pacific Group
Speaker 2: Ana Neves, Government, Western European and Others Group (WEOG)
Speaker 3: Ricardo Israel Robles Pelayo, Private Sector, Latin American and Caribbean Group (GRULAC)
Speaker 4: Peter Pissierssens, Intergovernmental Organization, Intergovernmental Organization
Speaker 5: Simon Hodson, Technical Community, Intergovernmental Organization

Relevance: 

Big data, as a new emerging and challenging technology, is providing unprecedented opportunities for information society and communities to address more complex tasks, especially in dealing with climate changes, which include changing weather patterns, rising sea level, and more extreme weather events. To address climate change, countries adopted the Paris Agreement at the COP21 in Paris on 12 December 2015 and entered into force shortly thereafter, on 4 November 2016. Implementation of the Paris Agreement is also essential for the achievement of the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals, and provides a roadmap for climate actions (SDGs 13). There are more and more big data programs and actions over the world in either global scale, such as Open Data in a Big Data Era (International Council for Sciences-ICSU), long term program, such as the International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange" (IODE-UNESCO), regional scales, such as Global Change Research Data Publishing & Repository (Chinese Academy of Sciences – CAS), and many local scale data programs. The new challenges from the big data cover the data in not only local scale, but regional and global; not only issues on data sharing, but data quality, security, timely, intellectual protection, networking, inter-operational technology etc. New laws, such as the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will frame a new big data environment. In order to recognize the big data challenges more focusable address the issues more efficiently and find out solutions more reliable, a common understanding of big data governance should come out soon.

Session Content: 

This workshop keeps to the theme of IGF 2018 “Development, Innovation & Economic Issues” and focuses on the big data governance for Paris Agreement and SDGs. The session is to be expanded in three parts: new milestone of the big data under global change, big data on laws and regulations, and big data network governance. The expected outcomes are: 1.Reach common understanding and explore cooperation mechanism of multistakeholders on big data and governance in implementing SDGs. 2.Holding a follow-up workshop next year and come out a big data governance principles and guidelines. 3.Finally achieve the global governance beyond the borders of countries and regions.

Interventions: 

Prof. Liu Chuang will start the session by welcoming all the speakers and audiences (including online participants) and then give the review of Global Change Research Data Publishing & Sharing. Dr. Simon Hodson, the Executive Director from Committee on Data of the International Council for Science, will talk about Open Data in Big Data Era. Ana Cristina Amoroso das Neves, from Department for the Information Society, Portugal, will discuss the introduction and interpretation of General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). Dr. Peter Pissierssens, Director of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission" (IOC) of UNESCO, will address Progress of the International Oceanographic Data and Information Exchange. Prof. Ricardo Israel Robles Pelayo, from International Commercial Law of the Universidad Humannas, Mexico, will address the policies and legal issues on Big Data in support of achieving SDGs.

Diversity: 

It is a multi-stakeholder discussion on the big data and intelligent governance on information society. Two females and three males among the five speakers confirmed, they are from Asia, Europe and South America. Among them two are from international government, and the rest are from the local government, education and academic communities, and private sectors. The diversity speakers will help the expected outcomes more efficient and benefit to all.

Online Participation: 

Online participation will be led by a facilitated dialogue. There will be a live broadcast on the meeting and online attendees will get involved in the workshop during the whole session. Besides, online attendees will have a separate queue and microphone which rotate equally with the mics in the room and is entitled to raise questions after each presentation of the speaker and engage during the panel discussion. Trained online moderator with previous experience will direct the online participation.

Discussion Facilitation: 

The moderator will open the session by welcoming all the participants, introducing the topic about to be discussed and the speakers present and online participants. (10 minutes) All Speakers make their presentation respectively. After each presentation, the moderator make comments and engage the audiences and online participants in a quick Q&A session. (40 minutes) Right after the presentations, the moderator will engage the panelists in a lively conversation to get their perspectives on the session and questions raised during the presentations. (20 minutes) The moderator will elicit what panelists find most insightful from the discussion and build on them by asking questions to create active flow of conversation with both panelists and experts in the audience. (10 minutes) The last ten minutes, the moderator will warp up the discussion by summarising the consensus of the facilitated dialogue and pointing out the challenges we are confronting. (10 minutes)

Onsite Moderator: 

Liu Chuang

Online Moderator: 

Zhou Xiang

Rapporteur: 

Liu Chang

Agenda: 

The workshop shall start with the welcome note and introduction with highlight of the discussion by Onsite Moderator Prof. Liu Chuang, and will keep time to ensure that panelists, audiences and online participants can meaningfully provide insights, comments and questions (5 Mins). After this introduction, she will give individual speaking slot to the Panel Speaker (5 Mins each). This will take around 40 minutes. Individual slots are utilized as follows:
1. Prof Liu Chuang, the Editor-in-Chief of Global Change Research Data Publishing & Repository, will provide an overview of global change research data publishing & sharing.  She will be discussing on the practices on data policies, and technology solution and information sharing for implementation of big data in achieving SDGs.
2. Dr. Peter Pissierssens, the Director of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) of UNESCO, will discuss about the progress of the international oceanographic data as well as the information exchange, including current policies, internet access, public resources, etc.
3. Ana Cristina Amoroso das Neves will provide the insight from the Government stakeholder group's perspective, and she will introduce and interpret the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that go towards a revolution of big data governance and responsibilities. 
4. Prof. Ricardo Israel Robles Pelayo, from the International Commercial Law of the Universidad Humannas, Mexico, will address the policies and legal issues on big data in support of achieving SDGs, specially highlighting the big data and human rights according to Mexican law, and the governance and legal issues of data access.
5. Dr. Simon Hodson, the Executive Director of the Committee on Data of the International Council for Science, will elaborate on the case of open data. His presentation will focus on current challenges, the socio-economic impacts, the emerging needs and other issues of open data in big data era. 
The Onsite Moderator Prof. Liu Chuang and Online Moderator Prof. Zhou Xiang will elicit what panelists find most insightful from the discussion and build on them by asking questions to create active flow of conversation with panelists, online participants and experts in the audiences (15 Mins).
The last five minutes, the Onsite Moderator will close the workshop by summarizing the consensus of the facilitated discussion (5 Mins).

Report: 

IGF 2018 Long Report

23 November 2018 

Big Data Governance for Paris Agreement & SDGs   

 

- Session Type (Workshop, Open Forum, etc.):  Workshop

 

- Title: Big Data Governance for Paris Agreement & SDGs     

 

- Date:  November 14th, 2018

 

- Time: 11:20am-12:20pm

 

- Organizer(s): 

China Association for Science and Technology

International Commercial Law of the Universidad Humannas, Mexico 

Department for the Information Society, Portugal

 

- Chair/Moderator:

Liu Chuang, China Association for Science and Technology (Chair/ Onsite Moderator)

  Ma Jing, China Association for Science and Technology(Online Moderator)

 

- Rapporteur/Notetaker:

   Liu Chang, China Association for Science and Technology

 

- List of speakers and their institutional affiliations (Indicate male/female/ transgender male/ transgender female/gender variant/prefer not to answer):

  Liu Chuang, China Association for Science and Technology  (Technical Community)

 Ana Cristina Amoroso das Neves, Department for the Information Society, Portugal  (Government)

Ricardo Israel Robles Pelayo, International Commercial Law of the Univer-sidad Humannas, Mexico (Civil Society)

 

- Theme (as listed here): Development, Innovation & Economic Issues

 

- Subtheme (as listed here): Big Data

 

- Please state no more than three (3) key messages of the discussion. [300-500 words]

Big data, as a new emerging technology, is providing an unprecedented opportunities for information society and communities to address more complex tasks. In order to enable people to advance environmental-friendly and economically, as well as to reach the Paris Agreement and achieve part of the SDGs, big data has become a new tool to govern the modern information society. The new challenges to the big data governance are not only local, but regional and global; not only issues from data sharing, but data quality, security, networking etc. 

The panel provided an overview of the practices on data policies, technology solution and information sharing for data governance and the implementation of big data in achieving SDGs.  

1. Data Sharing

Data sharing is the practice of making data used for scholarly research available to other investigators. Data sharing may also be restricted to protect institutions and scientists from use of data. Internet governance relies on a wide variety of data onto the structure, and usage patterns of operational Internet infrastructure must bring with deeper consideration of privacy and data sharing models. In order to encourage data sharing and prevent the loss or corruption of data, the policies on data sharing are urgent.

2. Policy and Legal framework for big data implementation in achieving SDGs

The intellectual property management and personal privacy protection under the data sharing require new regulation and policies, which go toward a revolution of big data governance. New laws, such as the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will no doubt frame a new big data environment. Therefore, it is important to promote the development of strategy and institutional guidelines of open data, especially in developing countries. The work on data policies and legal framework will benefit the improvement of developing countries to have the good practice of open data in achieving SDGs. 

3. Multi-stakeholder engagement

The implementation of internet and big data governance require the collaboration of civil society, government, technical communities, and individuals. The countries may collect the best practice and the good example of application and the communities can share the support of internet and big data. 

 

- Please elaborate on the discussion held, specifically on areas of agreement and divergence. [300 words] Examples: There was broad support for the view that…; Many [or some] indicated that…; Some supported XX, while others noted YY…; No agreement…

A main topic of discussion is to share bad and/or good experiences that stakeholder groups have had reported data governance of Paris Agreement and SDGs. In this discussion, it is identified that a critical component of sharing involves the need for any organization to participate and to have a contact. Big data strongly response to data resources and technology solution. The outcome and practices on data sharing, data policies and technology solution are good examples for implementation of big data in achieving SDGs. 

Prof. Liu Chuang gave a report, Open Data of Trust – A Honeycomb Solution: Publishing-Repository-Sharing-Citation-Impact from Global Change Research Data Publishing & Repository, and explained the concept of data sharing. Prof Liu pointed out that around 200,000-280,000 research datasets created each year in China in most recent years, but only no more than 5% can be accessed and shared. Most developing countries are facing the similar challenges. Open data as a strong support to data sharing, the outcome and practices on data policies, technology solution and information sharing are good examples for implementation of big data in achieving SDGs.

Ana Cristina Amoroso das Neves provided the insight from the Government stakeholder group's perspective, and introduced big data openness relate to SDGs. Ana gave an interpretation of the article 3, 4, 5 of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which directly relate to the personal data protection. According to article 4, personal data is any information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person - data subject (e.g. name, ID/passport number, online identifier) . In article 5 points out several principles to processing of (non-sensitive) personal data. New regulation, like GDPR, will go towards a revolution of big data governance.

Prof. Ricardo Israel Robles Pelayo, from the International Commercial Law of the Universidad Humannas, Mexico, addressed the importance of the legal regulation of big data and the protection for personal information about Mexico, from the recognition of human rights in the Mexican Constitution, as a way to guarantee the human right to privacy. This has led to the effort of the Mexican government to protect the increase in the traffic of personal data onto the creation of national laws, as well as the implementation of international legal instruments.

The outcome and practices on data policies need the integration and deep analysis on data collected at different levels, and the results will benefit different stakeholders, both to individuals and to communities. Open debate spread out from two aspects. One was data sharing among developing countries and the other one was the public understanding of GDPR. GDPR might face obstacles in implementation because of misunderstanding, so is necessary to educate and guide the public. The new challenges to big data governance are not only local, but regional and global, therefore, multi-stakeholder participation is also a key point in better sharing data. 

 

- Please describe any policy recommendations or suggestions regarding the way forward/potential next steps. [200 words] 

- All the important issues that have been mentioned through data sharing need to be tackled about different perspectives.

- A convergent model of regulation may contribute to the development of a dynamic and innovative Internet-enabled ecosystem. It’s necessary to educate and guide the public to have a right understanding of data sharing.

- To better governance the Internet, it is important to promote the development of strategy and institutional guidelines of big data and data policies for open data in developing countries. It’s very helpful for developing countries to have the good practice of open data in achieving SDGs. 

- There may also be valued in more regional and local cooperation that help build communities of knowledge, where specific problems are likely to be most understood. 

- A need for more people to become well trained and have a similar understanding of the basic problems.

 

- What ideas surfaced in the discussion with respect to how the IGF ecosystem might make progress on this issue? [150 words]

The implementation of big data governance of Paris Agreement and SDGs require the collaboration of all multi-stakeholders. IGF has a meaningful participation, and it is good to promote collaboration between different multi-stakeholders. 

The IGF ecosystem may be an appropriate forum to deal with data sharing and the internet governance, provided that this ecosystem is able to take up the task. Action plans can be formulated and conducted through cross-region cooperation under IGF framework. The countries may also collect the best practice and the good example of application and the communities can share the support of internet and big data, especially in developing countries. 

- Please estimate the total number of participants. 

   There are approximately 50 total participants.

 

- Please estimate the total number of women and gender-variant individuals present.

  Approximately 20 participants were women. The panel itself was gender balanced.

 

- To what extent did the session discuss gender issues, and if to any extent, what was the discussion? [100 words] 

The session was talked as a whole, in relation to any citizen, user or producer, did not directly address issues related to gender equality and/or women's empowerment.

However, it did consider challenges in how technical community, government and public sector security teams can successfully cooperate with civil society organizations.

- Session outputs and other relevant links (URLs):

Session Time: 
Wednesday, 14 November, 2018 - 11:20 to 12:20
Room: 
Salle X

Contact Information

United Nations
Secretariat of the Internet Governance Forum (IGF)

Villa Le Bocage
Palais des Nations,
CH-1211 Geneva 10
Switzerland

igf [at] un [dot] org
+41 (0) 229 173 678