Received Open Forums

IGF 2019 OF #3 African Union Open Forum

Description: 

The AU Open Forum aims at discussing digital inclusion in order to review accomplishments of the African IGF 2018, especially those segments related to Community Network, Access and Economic Development. The Forum will also discuss the Internet Governance Capacity Building activities of the AU-EU Project entitled Policy and Regulatory Initiative for Digital Africa (PRIDA), which focuses on digital inclusion.

Organizers: 

African Union

Speakers: 

Moctar Yedaly, African Union Commission
Makane Faye, African IGF Secretary
Mary Uduma, African IGF-MAG
Adil Sulieman, PRIDA & African IGF secretariat
Liliane Nalwoga, African IGF-MAG
Koffi Fabrice Djossou, PRIDA

Online Moderator: 

Aicha Jeridi, African IGF-MAG

SDGs: 

GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals

IGF 2019 OF #4 Cybersecurity investigation into vehicular communication

Description: 

The purpose is to examine cybersecurity of data information exchange between cars following a V2V scenario.

Organizers: 

Innov'COM
Innov'COM Laboratory of Sup'COM Tunisia

Speakers: 

Houda CHIHI senior researcher in ICT affiliated into Innov'COM Laboratory of Sup'COM Tunisia

Online Moderator: 

ISOC chapter of Tunisia

SDGs: 

GOAL 3: Good Health and Well-Being
GOAL 4: Quality Education
GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals

IGF 2019 OF #5 Looking beyend the isolation - The LLDC´s and the World

Description: 

Landlocked Developing Countries still face a visible underperformance in the access of quality and affordable connectivity, based on the dificulties of developing or accessing critical infrastructure and capacity building for governmental systems and empowering of individuals. This result in a higher challenge to achieve the SDGs, and particularly SGDs regarding the ensurance of Human Rights and the Rigth to development.
For this there is for the Global IGF to undesrtand the particular needs of the LLDC's in order to connect and interact with the world and, trough international cooperation, fulfill the commitment towards its peoples and the SGD 2030 Agenda.

Organizers: 

Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores de la República del Paraguay

Speakers: 

Foreign Affairs Ministry of Paraguay

Online Moderator: 

MIGUEL CANDIA IBARRA

SDGs: 

GOAL 1: No Poverty
GOAL 2: Zero Hunger
GOAL 3: Good Health and Well-Being
GOAL 4: Quality Education
GOAL 5: Gender Equality
GOAL 7: Affordable and Clean Energy
GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals

IGF 2019 OF #6 ICANN - DNS, Threats and Opportunities

Description: 

ICANN would be delighted to host an Open Forum with a theme closely connected to the Security, Safety, Stability and Resilience of the Internet and thus linked with Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs): 1, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 16.

While this Session will allow a significant opportunity for delegates to pose any questions to the ICANN CEO and President, as well as the Chair of the ICANN Board, the main focus will be on the overall Internet environment and the threats that have emerged recently for the stability and security of the Internet.

It will also address the recent initiative by ICANN to track legislation and regulation that could harm the fostering of an open, secure and single Internet; and thus allow opportunities to prevent unintended consequencies

Organizers: 

ICANN

Speakers: 

Goran Marby; CEO and President; ICANN
Theresa Swinehart, Senior Vice President, Multistakeholder Strategy and Strategic Initiatives

Online Moderator: 

Vera Major, ICANN

SDGs: 

GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals

IGF 2019 OF #7 Partnership for Inclusion in Lebanon

Description: 

OGERO is the executive arm and engine of the Ministry of Telecoms. Our network constitutes the backbone of all telecom networks in Lebanon including mobile, dsp, isp and others.
Ogero continue to improve and expand its services including voice and data based on fiber optics.
In the near future, ogero will move from connectivity offers to converged packages (voice, Internet, entertainment, TV programs and other)
End users will be able to set their own packages and can use a variety of devices from fixed or mobile access.
At Ogero we acknowledge the role of ICT and Internet as horizontal enablers for development and a cross cutting means for implementation and accordingly, we are aligning our core business strategies to accelerate progress in addressing the United Nations Sustainable development goals.
For this we are working in collaboration with the Private Sector, Technical Community and the Civil Society to reach our vision of digital future, utilizing innovative technologies for the benefit of the Lebanese citizens across our country.
While there may be a growing number of initiatives at local, regional and international levels aiming at improving Access, much needs to be done to ensure universal and inclusive meaningful access.

Organizers: 

OGERO Telecom, Gov, Lebanon

Speakers: 

Ms. Layal Jebran, ISOC, Technical community
Mr Marc Nader, Data Consult, Private Sector
Mr Antoine Aoun, MoT, Gov.
Ms. Zeina Bou Harb, Ogero, Gov

Online Moderator: 

Christelle Abi Aad

SDGs: 

GOAL 3: Good Health and Well-Being
GOAL 4: Quality Education
GOAL 5: Gender Equality
GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals

IGF 2019 OF #8 Trust, norms and freedom in the Internet

Description: 

In 2018, the world reached an important milestone – more than 50% of its population had access to the Internet. Open and interoperable internet has provided a platform for enormous economic development and political progress globally. Non-discriminatory access to and accessibility of the Internet are crucial for enabling and promoting the right to freedom of expression, assembly and association. It is critical that the stability of this platform is maintained by managing the increasing challenges. For many states, open, free and accessible cyberspace is part of their democratic identity; for some, Internet governance may seem to be yet another tool for executing state control.

Organizers: 

Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Estonia

Speakers: 

Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Estonia in cooperation with other stakeholders

Online Moderator: 

Heli Tiirmaa-Klaar

SDGs: 

GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

IGF 2019 OF #9 Strengthening Digital Ecosystem for Better Digital Inclusion

Description: 

In today's digital era, certainty and guarantee for digital inclusion is needed. Digital inclusion is a framework for assessing and considering access to opportunities in a digital era. Digital inclusion requires availability: a). availability of high-speed internet access infrastructure, b). digital literacy education program for acceleration of adoption, and c). information technology specifically in the form of online service platforms and useful applications.

Of course the three things above require a very strong adhesive, in the form of multi-stakeholder collaboration work. Multistakeholde work of course has become something that is accepted and appreciated by various parties as a way of being transparent, accountable and legitimate in order to achieve common goals. Internet access, digital literacy and information technology services, along with multistakeholder collaborative work form an ecosystem, a digital ecosystem, which of course will differ in challenges and opportunities from one country to another.

For this reason, it is necessary to exchange ideas and brainstorming from related parties so that collaborative work in each country can strengthen the digital ecosystem, and of course, ultimately can support the realization of digital inclusion.

Organizers: 

indonesia
Organizers:
Ministry of Communication and Information Technology of the Republic of Indonesia (MCIT)

Co-organizers:
- ID-IGF (Indonesia Internet Governance Forum)
- SIBERKREASI (Indonesian Digital Literacy National Movement)

Speakers: 

(proposed speakers, alphabetical order)

- Mr Arnold can Rhijn (Netherlands Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate Policy, Senior Policy Coordinator Global Internet Governance)
- Mr Anang Latif (The Telecommunication and ICT Accessibility Agency of Indonesia, CEO)
- Mr Dedy Permadi (Indonesia Digital Literacy National Movement SIBERKREASI, Chairman)
- Mrs Irene Poetranto (Citizen Lab of University of Toronto, Senior Researcher)
- Mr Jake Lucchi (Googgle, Head of Online Safety and Social Impact)
- Mrs Stephanie Borg-Psaila (Geneva Internet Platform, Interim Director)
- Representative from ID-IGF

Online Moderator: 

Indriyatno Banyumurti (ID-IGF)

SDGs: 

GOAL 4: Quality Education
GOAL 5: Gender Equality
GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals

IGF 2019 OF #10 How ready is LAC for cyber challenges?

Description: 

This Open Forum aims to provide a comprehensive picture and update on the state of cybersecurity in 32 countries Latin America and Caribbean countries. In 2018, the Cybersecurity Program of the Organization of American States, in partnership with the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), deployed the Cybersecurity Capacity Maturity Model for Nations (CMM) and collected data to assess countries’ maturity level regarding (1) cybersecurity policy and strategy, (2) culture and society, (3) education, (4) legal and regulatory frameworks, as well as (5) standards and technologies. This is the second edition of this one-of-a-kind study of the Americas, built based on a multi-stakeholder consultation, carefully balancing the need for security to enable social economic growth and sustainability, while respecting the right to free expression and the right to privacy.

Organizers: 

Organization of American States (OAS)

Speakers: 

Belisario Contreras, Cybersecurity Program Manager, Organization of American States (OAS)
A representative of Government
A representative of the Civil Society
A representative of the Private Sector

Online Moderator: 

Kerry-Ann Barrett

SDGs: 

GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

IGF 2019 OF #11 Data Governance and Competition

Description: 

The Open Forum will contribute to the global discussion about data governance by presenting and discussing the work of specialized advisory groups and committees in different countries, such as the Australian Competition & Consumer Commission, the UK Digital Competition Expert Panel, the EU Special Advisors on Competition Policy in the Digital Age and the German Federal Commission on Competition Law 4.0.

Organizers: 

Federal Ministry of Economics and Energy (Germany)
Martin Schallbruch, ESMT Berlin

Speakers: 

Representatives from Australian Competition & Consumer Commission, the UK Digital Competition Expert Panel, the EU Special Advisors on Competition Policy in the Digtial Age and the German Federal Commission on Competition Law 4.0

Online Moderator: 

tbd

SDGs: 

GOAL 3: Good Health and Well-Being
GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

IGF 2019 OF #13 Human Rights & AI Wrongs: Who Is Responsible?

Description: 

The impact of artificial intelligence (AI) on human rights and the viability of our democratic processes has become starkly visible during the Cambridge Analytica scandal and is increasingly debated since.
Countries committed to protecting human rights must ensure that those who benefit from developing and deploying digital technologies and AI are effectively held responsible for their risks and consequences. Effective and legitimate mechanisms are needed that will operate to prevent and forestall violations of human rights and to promote an enabling socio-economic- environment in which human rights and the rule of law are anchored. Only legitimate mechanisms ensure that we can properly, sustainably and collectively reap the many benefits of AI. This open forum addresses the following questions:
Who bears responsibility for the adverse consequences of advanced digital technologies, such as AI? How can we address the ‘control problem’ that flows from the capacity of AI-driven systems to operate more or less autonomously from their creators? What consequences stem from the fact that most data processing infrastructures are in private hands? What are the effects of the increasing dependence of public services on few, very large private actors?
The open forum will discuss the respective obligations of states and responsibilities for private actors regarding the protection and promotion of human rights and fundamental freedoms in the context of AI and machine learning systems. It will also explore a range of different ‘responsibility models’ that could be adopted to govern the allocation of responsibility for different kinds of adverse impacts arising from the operation of AI systems.
As background resources, the debate will build on the Council of Europe study of the implications of advanced digital technologies (including AI systems) for the concept of responsibility within a human rights framework and on the draft Recommendation of the Committee of Ministers to member States on the human rights impacts of algorithmic systems, available at: https://www.coe.int/en/web/freedom-expression/msi-aut

Organizers: 

Council of Europe
Council of Europe (CoE)
EU Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA)

Speakers: 

- MODERATOR – senior Council of Europe representative
- Seda Gürses, Associate Professor University of Delft
- David Reichel, FRA
- Moustapha Cisse, Google AI, Ghana (tbc)
- Eileen Donahoe, Executive Director, Global Digital Policy Incubator, Stanford University (tbc)

Online Moderator: 

Peter Kimpian

SDGs: 

GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

IGF 2019 OF #14 Online Protection of Underage Users

Description: 

It is proposed to invite government officials, representatives of international organizations, scholars and representatives of children to discuss issues related to children's online protection, to call on the whole world to join hands to pay attention to protect the legal rights and interests of children in cyberspace. We look forward to fully exchanging international experiences, discussing practical solutions, achieving a series of fruitful consensus on the protection of children online through IGF, especially on this forum.
1) Provide an in-depth exchange of experiences and practices in protection of children online and listen to their own ideas and suggestions;
2) Discuss the measures of children online protection such as policies, laws, economics as well as technology, and try to find out a feasible ways to strengthen the social co-governance;
3) Initiate a proposal for children online protection to promote the construction of a trustful and safety environment;
4) Promote the national legislation of children online protection,facilitate the participation of the children in the relevant decision-making process,raise the awareness of children, parents or guardians, educators and all the other stakeholders on protecting children from online risks while promoting the benefits of technical advancements for children.

Organizers: 

Cyberspace Administration of China
Bureau of Policy and Regulations,Cyberspace Administration of China

Speakers: 

1. Fatoumata Ndiaye Deputy Executive Director of UNICEF
2. Subbotin Vadim Deputy Head of the Federal Service for Supervision in the
sphere of Telecom, Information Technologies and Mass Communications
3. Tong Lihua Director of the Minor Protection Special Committee of the All-
China Lawyers Association, Director of Beijing Children's Legal Aid and Research Center
4.Wang Feng Director of The Department of Youth Rights Protection, Communist Youth League of China
5. Major Dana Humaid Almarzooqi Acting Director of Child Protection Centre at UAE's Ministry of Interior;Board Member of WePROTECT

Online Moderator: 

HE Bo

SDGs: 

GOAL 3: Good Health and Well-Being

IGF 2019 OF #16 Collaborative Multistakeholder Approaches in Cybersecurity

Description: 

Collaborative multistakeholder model at national, regional and global level in creating Cybersecurity strategies provide the framework to support an all encompassing approach to protect the Cyberspace infrastructure, its content, users and create cyber resilience. It states national priorities and goals, assigns roles and responsibilities and resources. A particularly important issue stems from the increased tying of ICT with critical infrastructure sectors and systems such as energy, transport, finance, healthcare, telecommunications, food and water supply. Many new areas are added to the list as “essential services”, some of the “e-“type (like e-health, e-commerce, etc). With robust cybersecurity frameworks in place, countries can better leverage the opportunities offered by ICT for socio economic development. We recognise however that implementation and budget allocation for cybersecurity activities presents a significant challenge for states. This proposed forum will therefore address how countries can build national cybersecurity systems with a multi-stakeholder cooperation and engagement framework beyond borders.

Organizers: 

Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation
 

Speakers: 

1.Gisa Fuatai Purcell, Acting Secretary General, CTO 2.Kathryn Jones, Senior Policy Advisor, International Cyber Security, Cyber Security and Data Protection Directorate, UK Government 3.Dr. Martin Koyabe, Manager Technical Support & Consultancy, CTO

Online Moderator: 

Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisations

SDGs: 

GOAL 4: Quality Education
GOAL 5: Gender Equality
GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals

IGF 2019 OF #17 Formulating Policy Options for Big Data and AI Development

Description: 

Formulating Policy Options for Big Data and AI Development: UNESCO advocates a ROAM approach (Rights, Openness, Access and Multi-stakeholder) UNESCO takes the occasion to trigger a multi-stakeholder policy discussion on the crucial challenges to guide the development of big data and the Artificial Intelligence (AI) in a conducive manner to enhance human rights and inclusive knowledge societies, in accord with UNESCO’s Internet Universality ROAM principles (Rights, Openness, Access and Multistakeholder). The Forum is designed to be a two-stage process that will culminate at IGF 2019 in an effort to translate UNESCO Internet Universality ROAM principles for governing the emerging technologies of Big Data and Artificial Intelligence. UNESCO will trigger the discussion by formulating two groups: each with two co-leaders who will convene pre-IGF online discussions with sub-group partners from governments, technical community academia, civil society, private sector and youth across five continents. These sub-groups will convene at IGF 2019 to give shape to their final positions and present policy options on the assigned policy issue. The process would be supported by the UNESCO secretariat with the goal of putting in practice a multistakeholder process for addressing issues concerning governance of Data along the openness, access and rights dimensions: Working Group 1- Openness and Access for Data and AI Under the dimension of Openness and Access, the following concerns arise: i. How to strengthen access to data for research? (Academia dimension) ii. How to strengthen access to data to reduce entry barriers for new startups? (Private sector dimension) iii. What a solutions would the stakeholders propose for addressing the data needs of each stakeholder and would options do they propose for policy makers? iv. How to prevent the digital divide related to big data and AI development to be further widened? Working Group 1-Rights and Governance of Data and AI The big data and AI development have multiple implications on human rights ranging from freedom of expression, privacy to right to equality. They are also changing the notion and operation of journalism and media development. The issue of data driven discrimination and biases is an impediment to building an inclusive society. The lack of representation in data is a cause of concern as it discriminates against some social groups and may marginalize them in society. Key concerns that arise include: i. What are the core human rights relation to big data and AI? ii. What are positive and negative consequences of the usage of bug data and AI-based tools in journalism and media development? iii. How to ensure that data used by algorithms for decision-making is representative? How to develop built-in mechanisms for checking discrimination based on data and algorithms? iv. How to address specic concerns freedom of expression a privacy and access to information? v. How should multi-stakeholder approach be operationalized and put in place at national and international levels to formulate inclusive policy options for harnessing big data and AI?

Organizers: 

UNESCO

Speakers: 

Moderator: Moez Chakchouk, UNESCO Assistant Director General for Communication and Information. UNESCO presentation on “Steering AI for Knowledge Societies: A ROAM Perspective” by Guy Berger, UNESCO Director for Freedom of Expression and Media Development Speakers for the working group 1: Prof. Maria Fasli, UNESCO Chair in Analytics and Big Data Mr. Ramanjit Singh Cheema, Asia Policy Director and Senior Counsel at Access Now. Ms. Kathleen Siminyu, Head of Data Science, Africa's Talking Ms Juliet K. Mutahi Software Engineer, IBM Research | Africa Speakers for working group 2: Ms. Anriette Esterhuysen, the leading Internet expert from Association for Progressive Communications (APC), South Africa Mr. Alexandre Barbosa, Head of the Regional Centre of Studies on Information and Communication Technololgies, Brazil Ms. Judith Lichtenberg, Global Network Initiative Rapporteurs: Xianhong Hu and Bhanu Neupane, UNESCO

Online Moderator: 

Mr. Prateek Sibal, UNESCO

SDGs: 

GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

IGF 2019 OF #18 Personal Information Protection

Description: 

It is proposed to invite government officials, representatives of international organizations and enterprises, scholars to discuss issues on personal information protection, to call on the whole world joining hands to focus on to protect the legal right and interest of everyone. In this forum, we will fully exchange international experience, discuss practical solutions, strengthen international cooperation and jointly maintain cyberspace security. At the same time, we will introduce China’s achievements on personal information protection, expound our ideas on personal information protection, put forward China’s plans and contribute Chinese wisdom for personal information protection. (1) Provide in-depth exchanges on experiences and practices of personal information protection. (2) Discuss measures of personal information protection such as policies, laws and regulations, as well as technologies, and promote international cooperation and governance. (3) Initiate a proposal for personal information protection to further promote the construction of a trustful and sound network environment. (4) Promote and improve the legislation of personal information protection, raise the awareness of internet users, governments, enterprises and all the other stakeholders on personal information protection.

Organizers: 

Bureau of Policy and Regulations, Cyberspace Administration of China

Speakers: 

1.Jack M. Balkin,the Knight Professor of Yale Law School,founder and director of the Yale Information Society Project 2. Jim Dempsey,executive director of BERKELEY CENTER FOR LAW & TECHNOLOGY. 3.Perry Keller,Reader in Media and Information Law of the Dickson Poon School of Law of of King's College London 4.Nohyoung Park,Dean of School of Law, and the Director of the Cyber Law Centre of Korea University 5. Christopher Kuner,Professor of law and co-chair of the Brussels Privacy Hub at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) in Brussels 6.Zhou Hanhua,Professor and Vice Director of Institute of law of China Academy of Social Sciences 7.Zhang Ping,Professor at Peking University Law School 8.Zhou Hui,Assistant Professor of Institute of law of China Academy of Social Sciences

Online Moderator: 

Li Min

SDGs: 

GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals

IGF 2019 OF #19 Human rights and digital platforms – contradiction in terms?

Description: 

The open forum will focus the debate again on the unsolved question of how an effective framework can be established to ensure that human rights are protected and can safely be exercised in the online environment.

Given their role as primary guardians of human rights, what steps must states take? What regulation is necessary? What are the precise responsibilities of platform operators towards the human rights of their users, notably the right to privacy and personal data protection and the right to freedom of expression? How can they be made effectively accountable?

The open forum will debate whether these challenges can be comprehensively addressed by self-regulation and co-regulation, or whether more legislative steps at national or international level are required.

Digital platforms, civil society and tech community representatives will be invited to take an active part in this discussion and present arguments and counter-arguments about their preferred model of governing these issues.

Organizers: 

Council of Europe

Speakers: 

Moderator: Wolfgang Schulz, Professor, Hans-Bredow Institut for Media Research, Hamburg, Chair of the former Committee of Experts on Internet intermediaries (MSI-NET), Council of Europe

Malcolm Hutty, Chair of the Intermediary Liability Committee of EuroISPA (Association of European Internet Service Providers) tbc

Maria Luisa Stasi, Senior Legal Officer, Article 19 tbc

Katharina Zweig, Professor for Informatics, Kaiserslautern University tbc

Facebook / Twitter representative tbc

Online Moderator: 

Peter Kimpian, Council of Europe

SDGs: 

GOAL 5: Gender Equality
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

IGF 2019 OF #20 Algorithmic Impact Assessments - a key to transparency?

Description: 

The Open Forum will introduce the concept of Algorithmic Impact Assessments (AIAs) and engage participants, via concrete cases of use of AI by public institutions, in “designing” such Assessments in terms of procedures, criteria to be used and impact indicators.
The underlying assumption for the Open Forum session is that Algorithmic Impact Assessments should be compulsory prior to implementing AI-driven technological solutions by the public administrations. Their introduction will increase algorithmic transparency because every affected party will be engaged from the very beginning in the process of their creation. The parties (in particular users/citizens) would know what the government wants to achieve, how it will measure the results, what groups will be impacted, what risks can occur and by which means they can be prevented. The AIAs, if done in a responsible way, should also provide the ground for refusing the implementation of algorithms, when risks are likely to be higher than benefits.
Policy questions: how should Algorithmic Impact Assessments look? Which institutions should be entrusted to verify them? What questions should be asked before creating and using algorithmic systems, and how to measure the impact? How to ensure stakeholder involvement in the process?

Organizers: 

Council of Europe
European Commission against Racism and Intolerance; ePaństwo Foundation (Poland)working on government transparency and data, Amnesty International

Speakers: 

Krzysztof Izdebski, Policy Director of ePaństwo Foundation (Poland)
Merel Koning, Senior Policy Officer Technology and Human Rights, Amnesty International
Prof. Frederik Zuiderveen Borgesius, Professor of Law, Radboud University, NL

Online Moderator: 

Sandrine Marroleau

SDGs: 

GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

IGF 2019 OF #21 Digital Inclusion in the Arab Region

Description: 

It has become self evident that many of today’s ills of the digital realm could not be tackled and mitigated without the enhanced and full participation of all communities around the world, with ‘no one left behind’. Full digital inclusion of all community is key to reaching workable solutions that are sustainable, effective, and scalable across borders.

Several forms of the Digital Divide evolved in recent years, with gaps emerging, and with existing gaps exacerbated. The fast pace of new technologies has widened these gaps, both in adoption of these technologies and in developing policies around them. This has made it more urgent than ever to address the barriers such as infrastructure, affordability, digital skills, content and its creation, among other barriers.

Realising the SDGs for everyone by 2030 will depend on empowering people across gender, languages, accessibility needs, geographies, affordability levels, and communities to effectively adopt digital technologies, and maximise the benefit of its use across sectors like health, education, etc.

This Open Forum session will explore how these challenges are being addressed across the Arab region, and tools for all stakeholders to overcome barriers.

Organizers: 

UNESCWA
League of Arab States and UNESCWA

Speakers: 

Proposed Speakers (roundtable format):
1- Mr. Karim Abdelghani, ITU Arab Regional Office (IGO)
2- Mr. Charles Shaban, TAGI (PS)
3- ISOC (TBC)
4- Ms. Christine Arida, NTRA (GOV)
5- Mr. Imad Kreidieh, Ogero (GOV/PS)
6- Ms. Hanane Boujemi (Expert)

Online Moderator: 

Zahr Bou-Ghanem

SDGs: 

GOAL 1: No Poverty
GOAL 4: Quality Education
GOAL 5: Gender Equality
GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities
GOAL 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals

IGF 2019 OF #22 Trust, Norms and Freedom in Cyberspace

Description: 

This open forum under the third programme theme of IGF 2019 with the focus on Security, Safety, Stability and Resilience will analyze the links between trust, norms and freedom in cyberspace. Occurring only a few days before the first meeting of the next UN GGE, the panel will create a platform for exchange of thoughts on the existing norms of responsible state behavior in cyberspace. The panel will focus on the ongoing discussions regarding the norms of cyber security (and internet governance) while keeping in mind the aim of preserving open, free and accessible cyberspace. The key points of the discussion will emerge from the notion that there is a need to discuss further the implementation of norms of responsible state behavior in cyberspace. Protection of human rights and basic freedoms in cyberspace is the underlying principle of the internationally recognised cyber norms. The GGE, among others, has confirmed that states must comply with their obligations under international law to respect and protect human rights and fundamental freedoms.

Organizers: 

Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Ms. Pille Kesler, Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Speakers: 

Speaker 1: Amb. Heli Tiirmaa-Klaar (Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and a representative of the next UN GGE 2019-2021); Speaker 2: NGO [TBC]; Speaker 3: Business representative [TBC]; Moderator: Mr. Matthew Shears

Online Moderator: 

Mr. Matthew Shears

SDGs: 

GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

IGF 2019 OF #23 EQUALS in Tech Awards

Description: 

The annual EQUALS in Tech awards are organized and presented by the EQUALS Global Partnership – a network of 90+ organizations, companies, UN agencies and research institutions – whose founding partners include the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), UN Women, International Trade Centre, GSMA, and United Nations University. Together, the partnership works to bring the benefits of information and communication technologies (ICTs) to women and girls, and to help women succeed in the tech sector.

The sixth annual EQUALS in Tech Awards celebrate initiatives that are closing the gender digital divide. This year, the number of categories will still reflect the structure of EQUALS, the Global Partnership to Bridge the Gender Digital Divide.
• Access: Initiatives related to improving women’s and girls’ digital technology access, connectivity and security
• Skills: Initiatives that support development of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) skills of women and girls
• Leadership (2 subcategories):
o Initiatives focused on promoting women in decision-making roles within the ICT field
o Initiatives promoted by tech sector companies to bridge the digital gender divide
• Research: Initiatives prioritizing research on gender digital divides and producing reliable evidence to tackle diversity issues within STEM and computing fields

Winners will be flown from around the globe to attend and receive their awards at the ceremony, to share their inspiring stories, and to build their professional networks with other winners and attending EQUALS partners. The awards demonstrate just how impactful ICTs can be for women and girls to improve their personal and professional lives.

Organizers: 

International Telecommunication Union
Carla Licciardello, International Telecommunication Union

Speakers: 

Potential Speakers:
GSMA & ITU (Mats Granryd & Houlin Zhao)
Germany BMZ or GIZ (TBC)
ISOC (Andrew Sullivan)
UN Women (Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka)
UNU (David Malone)

Online Moderator: 

TBC

SDGs: 

GOAL 5: Gender Equality
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals

IGF 2019 OF #24 Business and Human Rights in Technology Project: Applying th

Subtheme: 
Description: 

In a context of increased demands from companies for authoritative guidance on the application of the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights in the tech sector, UN Human Rights has launched last June at RightsCon in Tunis a project on tech and human rights. The project seeks to address the growing urgency from companies, civil society and policy makers to find principled and pragmatic ways to address the socio-political harms that might, or do, occur during the application of digital technologies, including AI, by the private and public sectors. These issues are increasingly seen through the lens of human rights risks, not just ethical dilemmas. The lens has widened to bring into view issues of governance, public policy, and corporate responsibility and accountability. This makes the UNGPs a useful framework to prevent, address and remedy the vast array of actual or potential harm related to digital technologies. Through convening an inclusive process of consultations and research involving key actors (public and private), the project will ultimately provide a roadmap to the application of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGPs) to the development and use of digital technologies, comprising policy guidance and public policy recommendation to realize a rights-based approach to the application and governance of digital technologies. Roughly six months after the launch of the project, the Open Forum session will provide an update on the process and an opportunity to reflect, discuss and invite feedback from the participants on some of its very early and preliminary assessments. In particular, the session will gather a number of selected expert speakers involved in the project to discuss: - some of the most salient human rights issues that have been identified so far and which are related to the development and application of some AI selected digital technologies - how the UNGPs offers a framework for identifying, mitigating, and remedying the human rights risks posed by these technologies.

Organizers: 

OHCHR

Speakers: 

Ms. Lene Wendland Chief Human Rights and Economic and Social Issues Section Thematic Engagement, Special Procedures and Right to Development Division Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights

Online Moderator: 

Lene Wendland

SDGs: 

GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

IGF 2019 OF #25 Technological Innovation and Challenges to Data Governance

Description: 

As the new round of global technological revolution and industrial transformation unfolds, modern information technologies represented by Artificial Intelligence, 5G and Big Data have made continuous breakthroughs, injecting new impetus into global economic development. At the same time, with the accelerated popularization and application of data-driven new technologies, regulatory, legal and ethical issues ensue and cross border, profoundly impacting global data governance, cyber security and sustainable development, and dealing fresh demands and challenges to global Internet governance system and rules. Against the back drop of mounting factors and uncertainties in cyberspace as well as the data governance model to be improved, countries across the world should enhance exchanges and cooperation, through open, interactive and diversified international dialogues to explore data governance mechanism and trustworthy use of new technologies, with a view to promoting global digital development and the building of a more fair and reasonable global Internet governance system.
The proposed Open Forum seeks to engage high-level delegates and distinguished experts from governments, international organizations, enterprises, technical communities and think tanks in the global Internet sector. Through in-depth discussion centering on development opportunities and challenges to global social and economic progress brought about by AI, 5G and other Internet technological innovations, this Forum will examine and share ideas on issues such as the impact of data governance policies and trends on the development of new technologies across the globe, international rules making on data governance and new technologies as well as the relationship, role and position of the public and private sector in data governance mechanism. It also encourages best practice sharing on data governance and personal information protection for all parties and exploration on a collaborative data governance model with multi-party participation, in a bid to promote a data governance mechanism at the global level that contributes to a peaceful, secure, open, cooperative and orderly cyberspace and a community with a shared future in cyberspace.

Organizers: 

Cyberspace Administration of China
Cyberspace Administration of China
Chinese Academy of Cyberspace Studies

Speakers: 

Delegate from Bureau of International Cooperation, Cyberspace Administration of China
Prof. Li Yuxiao, Vice President, Chinese Academy of Cyberspace Studies; Secretary-General, Cybersecurity Association of China
Zhang Yiming, Founder and CEO, Bytedance
Delegate from Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy, Germany
Stephen Ibaraki, Founder, ITU AI for Good Global Summit
Andrew Wyckoff, Director, Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation, OECD
Harry Shum, Executive Vice President, Microsoft
Prof. Frederick Douzet, Chairwoman, Castex Chair of Cyber Strategy, IHEDN
Prof. Kilnam Chon, Member of the Internet Hall of Fame, Father of Korean Internet
Dr. Demi Getschko, CEO of the Brazilian Network Information Center, Member of the Internet Hall of Fame
Prof. Wolfgang Kleinwachter, Professor Emeritus of University of Aarhus

Online Moderator: 

Delegate from Cyberspace Administration of China

SDGs: 

GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities
GOAL 12: Responsible Production and Consumption
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals

IGF 2019 OF #26 FOC Open Forum

Description: 

The Freedom Online Coalition (FOC) is an intergovernmental coalition of 30 countries committed to advancing Internet freedom – free expression, association, assembly, and privacy online – worldwide. This Open Forum will provide IGF participants with the opportunity to learn more about the FOC's activities under Ghana's Chairmanship of the Coalition, the implementation of FOC activities under the Program of Action for 2019-2020, including the upcoming FO Conference in Accra. This session will include a discussion on the FOC's Joint Statement on Digital Inclusion, and its recommendations to stakeholders. In this session IGF participants will be encouraged to engage directly with the panellists of FOC and FOC Advisory Network Members, to discuss the FOC's priorities and activities relating to digital inclusion, and bridging the digital divide. Participants in the session will be invited to pose questions and comments and participate in a lively discussion on promoting and protecting human rights in the face of ongoing and emerging threats to freedom online.

Organizers: 

Freedom Online Coalition Support Unit
This session is being submitted by the FOC Support Unit and the governments of Germany, Ghana and the US:

Rainer Schmiedchen, Federal Foreign Office, Germany

Emmanuella Darkwah, Ministry of Communications, Ghana

Jordyn Arndt, US Department of State

Speakers: 

Rainer Schmiedchen, Federal Foreign Office, Germany Albert Antwi-Boasiako, Ministry of Communications, Ghana Bernard Shen, Microsoft Mallory Knodel, Article 19

Online Moderator: 

Aisha Simon

SDGs: 

GOAL 5: Gender Equality
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

IGF 2019 OF #27 Ethical Policy Frameworks for Artificial Intelligence

Description: 

UN Global Pulse, an innovation initiative of the Secretary General of the United Nations on the subject of Big Data, and the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development have conducted a pilot project in 2019 on "Ethical Policy Frameworks for Artificial Intelligence in the Global South". The project aims to develop local ethical policy frameworks for AI in the pilot countries Uganda and Ghana. The aim is to enable the countries to use AI innovations more quickly and effectively to achieve the sustainability goals. The long-term goal is an "African Declaration on AI for the SDGs" by 2021. The project is expected to achieve two results in 2019 that shall be presented and discussed with the community on the global IGF 2019 in Berlin as part of its Data Governance track.

Organizers: 

GIZ - Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit
Robert Kirkpatrick, Director, UN Global Pulse
Johannes Wander, Advisor Sector Programme Digital Development, GIZ Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit
Andreas Foerster, Head of Digital technologies for development unit, German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development

Speakers: 

Paula Hidalgo-Sanchis, Pulse Lab Uganda, UN Global Pulse
Derval Usher, Managing Director, Pulse Lab Jakarta, UN Global Pulse
Andreas Foerster, Head of Digital technologies for development unit, German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development
Nicole Celikkesen, Advisor Sector Programme Digital Development, GIZ Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit

Online Moderator: 

Johannes Wander

SDGs: 

GOAL 5: Gender Equality
GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities

IGF 2019 OF #28 Internet Governance with and for the Citizens

Description: 

----------- Internet Governance with and for the Citizens: Setting the Agenda for IGF2020 ----------- Humanity deserves and asks for better governance. Both citizens and decision makers are ready to experiment with new approaches. Decisions taken on behalf of 7+ billion human beings require to augment the traditional expertise with the vision and experience of ordinary citizens that will enrich, legitimize and strengthen the decisions. New forms of political non-partisan dialogue between citizens, decision makers and experts are one of the most promising solutions to improve governance towards a more inclusive, more trustful and less divided society, at all levels, from local to global. By relying on such processes, decisions become more in tune with the complexity of our age, more legitimate and more sustainable. Decision makers gain in legitimacy, insights and transparency. Citizens enter the realm of complexity of decision making and get the feeling of being respected and considered by the political sphere. Both are strengthened by this unique interaction. ------------------------------------------ Bringing Citizens into Internet Governance ------------------------------------------ The Global Citizens’ Debate on the Future of Internet (https://www.wetheinternet.org) aims at opening a dialogue between the Internet Governance community and ordinary citizens of the world. On September 27th and 28th, thousands of citizens selected to represent the diversity of their country will gather, inform themselves and discuss core questions related to the future of internet and articulate their wishes, concerns, arguments and opinions. This full scale debate will build upon a series of preliminary conversations organized in 12 countries on 4 continents in December 2018 that have raised topics that are of high concern to both citizens and decision makers. ---------------------- Goal of the Open Forum ---------------------- The Open forum aims at: 1. Presenting the results of the preliminary conversations and full scale debate to the Internet Governance Community in order to transform them into actionable actions and discussions for the multi-stakeholder process. 2. Reflecting the method in order to improve it and to understand how to best integrate it in the Multi-stakeholder process in the coming years. Format of Open Forum ---------------------- Program ---------------------- The Forum will be shaped as a participatory event: participants will sit at tables and discuss the results of the debate in order to transform them into actionable learnings and actions for them. 1. Opening (15’) Short presentation of project and process (Missions Publiques). Feedback from core partners of the Advisory Board and national partners of the project (2M and 2F, 2 developed country / 2 global South) and from participants to the debate (ordinary citizens representing diverse countries). 2. Discussion / Break-out groups (45’) Participants are randomly split into groups of 5 (maximum diversity). In each group, a facilitator and a note taker guide the discussion. They discuss the following questions (not exclusive): How do these results inspire me for my strategy, my advocacy, my position? What do they mean for us as a community? What are most meaningful results in relation with the IGF agenda?” Which discussions do they impulse, which actions? 3. Presentation of results of the groups and conclusion (30’) Participants gather in plenary, note takers present the key results of their group. Online participation will be organized as a mirror of the f2f participation: 1. E-Opening (15’) The remote participants will be in a listening position and will be in the virtual room. Two of the feedback in the beginning will be delivered by remote participants: One organizer and one participant. 2. E-Discussion / E-Break-out groups (45’) Online participants will be invited to join virtual rooms (links will be provided at the beginning of the session - participants will be dispatched in function of the first letter of their country of origin). In each group, a facilitator and a note taker will guide the discussion. The virtual group will discuss the same two questions as the f2f groups. 3. E-Presentation of results of the groups and conclusion (30’) Online participants will join back the plenary, remote note takers will present the key results of their group.

Organizers: 

Missions Publiques
Berger, Cathleen - Mozilla - Global - Private Sector

Castex, Lucien - Internet Society France - Civil Society

Cassa, Concettina - Agenzia per l’Italia Digitale - Italy - Government

Gatto, Raquel - ISOC - Global - Technical Community

Gerlach, Jan - Wikimedia Foundation - Civil Society

Eniola - World Economic Forum - Global - Other

Oyako, Arthur - African Freedom of Information Center - Uganda - Civil Society

Scialpi, Valentina - DG Connect - European Commission - Europe - International Organization

Senges, Max - Google - Germany - Private Sector

Shcherbovich, Andrey - National Research University, Higher School of Economics - Russian Federation - Academics

Speakers: 

Nota Bene: see methodology: All participants to the Forum will be “speakers”. The list of persons below is the list of persons that are at the core of the process and will act as table facilitators and resource persons during the discussions. There will be no frontal input apart from the introduction. Berger, Cathleen - Mozilla - Global - Private Sector Bruns, Eike - Bundesministerium für Wirtschaft und Energie - Germany - Government Castex, Lucien - Internet Society France - Civil Society Cassa, Concettina - Agenzia per l’Italia Digitale - Italy - Government Cervellini, Silvia - Delibera Brazil - Brazil - Civil Society Farooque, Mahmud - Arizona State University CSPO - USA - Academics Gatto, Raquel - ISOC - Global - Technical Community Gerlach, Jan - Wikimedia Foundation - Civil Society Hussain, Faheem - School for the Future of Innovation in Society, Arizona State University - Bangladesh - Civil Society Ikebe, Yasushi - Miraikan (Tokyo National Science Museum) - Japan - Academics Mafe, Eniola - World Economic Forum - Global - Other Oyako, Arthur - African Freedom of Information Center - Uganda - Civil Society Scialpi, Valentina - DG Connect - European Commission - Europe - International Organization Senges, Max - Google - Germany - Private Sector Shcherbovich, Andrey - National Research University, Higher School of Economics - Russian Federation - Academics We will invite to this event 5 participants of the Citizens Debates. They will be chosen so as to represent the 5 continents.

Online Moderator: 

Judith Ferrando

SDGs: 

GOAL 4: Quality Education
GOAL 5: Gender Equality
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

IGF 2019 OF #29 Public Service Internet, how media could fix the cyberspace

Description: 

During the last 12 months we have assisted to a wide growth of the consciouness that the idea of Internet as public space has been put at risk by the greedyness of some companies, by the mass surveillance of some governments and by the misuse by some states or by groups of pressure.
Public Service Broadcasters members of the EBU in Europe (as well as their fellows in other parts of the world)have started to build new models of Internet communities based on the same values and principles of human rights that are inspiring Public Service Broadcasting since near 100 years. These principles -based on human rights- are openness, transparence, accountability, access to culture, correct information, sustain to local contents and language, creation of communities for good and not for profit, respect of privacy, support of social cohesion, and more recently, digital literacy and fight to digital divide. During the last year many initiatives (alone and in partnerhip with other institutions) have been promoted to start to build the PSI or Public Service Internet, within our membership, but also in partnership with civil society, industry and tech community, or even promoted directly by civil society organization inspired by the Public Service model.
BBC has launched the PSI (Public Service Internet) initiative. In the Netherlands has been launched the project Public Spaces, in Germany ZDF has launched a portal common to all cultural institutions of the country and so on.
Similarly, also within EBU, have been launched project Eurovox for setting standard for vocal personal assistant to guarantee pluralism; or project PEACH for algorithms of personalization and recommandation respectful of citizens' privacy; project Eurovision Social newswire to debunk fake news; project for Big Data journalism, to support initiatives of investigative journalisms that work through algorithms to chase data through big data; project Journalism Trust Initiative with RWB and UNESCO on disinformation and so on.
The Open Forum PSI will be used to present some of these initiatives and to interact with other organizations with whom we are cooperating on these issues, such as UNESCO (that has just released the Indicators on the quality of Internet), Council of Europe (that is producing reports over A.I. and media), WIPO (support to protection of authors' rights and broadcasting treaty), etc.

Organizers: 

EBU
European Broadcasting Union (EBU) - Union Européenne de Radiotélévisions
co-organizers:
UNESCO and WIPO

Speakers: 

Justyna Kurczabynska, EBU head of Eurovision News Exchange
Antonio Arcidiacono, EBU director of Technology
Xiangong Hu, UNESCO Communication & Information
Carole Croella, WIPO Copyright law division
(TBC) representative BBC project PSI or project Public Spaces
(TBC) representative German broadcaster

Online Moderator: 

Giacomo Mazzone, EBU

SDGs: 

GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities
GOAL 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

IGF 2019 OF #31 Bridging the Digital in a large humanitarian organization

Description: 

IFRC is leading a digital transformation project for our organization. We'll share insights, needs and examples of digital success, digital divide and risks on our journey. We are asking ourselves:
What would a digitally transformed National Society look like? What does a digitally transformed IFRC network look like? Are we ‘fit for future’?

Some of our research:

New technologies are transforming the world and how people live and work. Data analytics, robotics, and artificial intelligence are just a few examples of transformative technology that can positively impact Red Cross and Red Crescent capacity to address humanitarian and development need. However, there are risks with emerging technologies, that the benefits will not be felt by all, and the digital divide can create further inequality for those left behind. Digital literacy and data readiness are intrinsically linked. Without the infrastructure and skills to harness technology for humanitarian action, we are unable to fully realize the opportunities that digital and data resources/skills bring for leadership, impact, and evidence.” (Strategy 2030 White Paper)

“We are leaving people behind by not being equitable in the application of technology and the potential opportunities this brings. This growing gap highlights a power dynamic that the innovations and the programs we deliver might not 1. Meet the needs 2. Include the local communities fully in the process. 3. Protect the most vulnerable from cyber risks. The IFRC commits to continue to invest in its own, and its members’, capacity to gather and analyse relevant data designed to determine whom is most in need and to detect anyone who might be left behind.” (World Disasters Report, November 2018)

Organizers: 

IFRC
International Federation of Red Cross Red Crescent Societies (IFRC)

Speakers: 

IFRC (Heather Leson)
Various National Societies (TBD)
Business Partners (TBD)

(Note: IFRC was part of a Diplo Foundation panel on Data in Humanitarian Action in 2017)

Online Moderator: 

Heather Leson

SDGs: 

GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals

IGF 2019 OF #32 EQUALS Research Open Forum on Gender Digital Equality

Description: 

This open forum will reflect on the activities of the EQUALS Research Group led by UN University Institute on Computing and Society (UNU-CS). EQUALS is a global partnership co-founded by ITU, UN Women, GSMA, the International Trade Center and UNU to close gender digital gaps. With over 60 partner institutions worlwide, EQUALS consists of three Coalitions on Access, Skills, and Leadership, as well as a crosscutting research group. EQUALS partners will discuss the themes of the Research Group’s March 2019 report (Taking Stock: Data and Evidence on Gender Equality in Digital Access, Skills, and Leadership), share their contributions to generating relevant data and evidence, and discuss evidence-based pathways to gender digital equality.

Organizers: 

UN University Institute on Computing and Society (UNU-CS)

Speakers: 

Doreen Bogdan-Martin, ITU
Birgit Frank, BMZ
Nancy Hafkin, Women in Global Science and Technology
Diana Rusu, UN Women
Mariagrazia Squicciarini, OECD
Tim Unwin, Royal Holloway University of London
Dhanaraj Thakur, Web Foundation
Jorge Manhique Disability Rights Fund

Online Moderator: 

Araba Sey

SDGs: 

GOAL 4: Quality Education
GOAL 5: Gender Equality
GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals

IGF 2019 OF #33 Developing policy guidelines for AI and child rights

Description: 

This year marks the 30th anniversary of the adoption of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). As the global community reflects on progress made, one change to the world of 1989 will significantly impact the next 30 years for children’s rights: artificial intelligence (AI). Progress in AI systems, unprecedented amounts of data to train algorithms, and increased computing power are expected to profoundly impact life and work in the 21st century, raising both hopes and concerns for human development. A number of governments, businesses, civil society organizations and researchers are rightly concerned about the future of AI for societies. They recognize the current window of opportunity to lay down ethical and policy safeguards, and to practically develop the software, algorithms and data standards needed to maximize the benefits while limiting the risks of an AI future. Yet, in our initial findings, the impact of AI on children is largely missing from these concerns and efforts. It appears that for governments, the private sector and civil society, there is a policy vacuum for considered and practical guidance on AI and children (see https://medium.com/politics-ai/an-overview-of-national-ai-strategies-2a7...). A key program for UNICEF will be the development of a policy guidance for governments, businesses, the non-profit sector and the Organization itself, which, if applied, will create environments that support the safe and beneficial use of AI systems for children’s development. UNICEF will lead the creation of the guidance in partnership with a range of external stakeholders, including the Berkman Klein Centre, the IEEE, and interested governments. Beyond creating guidelines, a key challenge is how to translate them into practice. Implementing guidelines poses difficult decisions, such as finding the balance between the right to privacy and the benefits of big data-fueled interventions that can protect children. The guidance will thus be piloted with policy makers in select countries for validation and learnings as broad principles are adapted to different country contexts. Such implementation will create case studies for other countries to learn from, as well as provide feedback that can inform subsequent versions of the guidance. Please see the attached concept note for more information on the overall project. As the IGF will take place during the project, the proposed Open Forum policy question is: What policy frameworks are needed to ensure that AI enables the realization of child rights and respects the key principles enshrined in the CRC? Between now and the IGF in November, UNICEF will co-host a AI and child rights workshop with the World Economic Forum in San Francisco in May, host a workshop in New York in June, and collaboratively develop the draft guidelines with governments. In the Open Forum UNICEF, along with the Berkman Klein Center, will present the workshop outcomes and draft guidelines – as a work in progress – and seek further input and collaboration with the audience. The session seeks diverse inputs and will also convene some of the few governments working on AI guidelines or principles that have a specific focus on youth. This critically important work will be strengthened by thematic and regional variations in the session, and contribute to putting child rights on the AI policy agenda. The work is directly linked to the Data Governance theme of the IGF, sharing emerging approaches to ensure the development of child-centric data governance frameworks at national, regional and international levels.

Organizers: 

UNICEF
Sandra Cortesi, Director of Youth and Media, Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, Harvard University

Speakers: 

Steven Vosloo, Policy Specialist - Digital Connectivity, Policy Lab, UNICEF Jasmina Byrne, Chief, Policy Lab, UNICEF Sandra Cortesi, Director of Youth and Media, Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, Harvard University Speakers from a diversity of governments working on AI policies, such as: Finland, Colombia (Armando Guio), United Arab Emirates (names to be confirmed in the coming months)

Online Moderator: 

Alexa Hasse

SDGs: 

GOAL 5: Gender Equality
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

IGF 2019 OF #34 Enhancing Digital Inclusion Through Digital Governance

Description: 

Digital inclusion is a social inclusion in the 21st century that ensure individuals and disadvantaged groups have access to, and skill to use Information and Communication Technology (ICT). Students nowdays are called ‘digital native’ or a group of students that have great understanding of modern technology, particularly the Internet. Students of the current period were raised along the rapid advancement of information and communications technology resulting in their being accustomed to using ICTs (including the Internet) for resolving their daily tasks and chores. The idea of digital natives has been accepted by the public and adopted by numerous educational institutions, as seen in their strategic plans designed for developing their curriculum and education system. But, unfortunately, the digital native concept has very little evidence to prove the idea that “students inherently know how to use technology, especially in how to process online information from the internet”. The unequal understanding of the use of Internet by students in the academia has led to a weakness of evidence in support of the argument pertaining to the digital native concept in the society. The difference in students’ experiences and preparedness is caused by several factors, such as: access to technology; economic conditions; and less educated parents. Therefore, the governments are, hence, expected to become institutions that act as a mediator between technological advancements and students in the era of digital disruption. What is meant by mediator is that the institution should continue to innovate in providing and developing an education system that includes students’ mastery of digital skills. Solution for those problems is to increase the government role to implement digital literacy education for students in Indonesia. One of the best way is to strengthen the implementation of digital governance. Digital literacy is very important to be implemented in the primary, secondary, and even tertiary educational system because digital literacy matters as it helps student learning and citizenship by teaching students how to fine, evaluate, use and create digital content in meaningful ways. Digitally literate students will confident using digital content and tools in their learning. Digital literacy skills enable them to: find and access digital content that is fit for purpose; analyse and combine information to develop their own understandings; create and share digital content in purposeful ways. To better understand digital literacy, an understanding of the issues pertaining to digital literacy implementation is necessary. There are also impeding factors instigated by the government and the community in the implementation of digital literacy. Firstly, there is the matter of government readiness, which is an internal issue of the government in its implementation of digital governance. Secondly, the digital divide may also be considered an impeding factor which originates from within the community itself in relation to the implementation of digital governance. However, from a number of existing studies, it can be surmised that government readiness on implementing digital governance may be measured based on some of the following items: infrastructure availability, both physical and non-physical; civil servant aptitude in operating ICT; national income, which influence the country’s access to technology; and government collaboration with other stakeholders in implementing digital governance policy agenda.

Organizers: 

IGF Indonesia
Organizers : Indonesia – Internet Governance Forum (ID IGF) Co-Organizers : 1. Ministry of Communication and Information Technology (MCIT) of the Republic of Indonesia 2. Indonesian Digital Literacy National Movement: SIBERKREASI

Speakers: 

Proposed Speakers : 1. Mr. Cédric Wachholz, Programme Specialist, Communication and Information Sector, Knowledge Societies Division, UNESCO* 2. Mr. Gridl Rudolf, Head of Unit, Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy, Berlin* 3. Dr. Jovan Kurbalija, DiploFoundation* 4. Mrs. Mariam F. Barata, Director of Application Governance, MCIT Indonesia and Coordinator MAG Indonesia IGF 5. Mr. Muhadjir Efendi, Ministry of Education and Culture Repbulic Indonesia* 6. Representative from Google 7. Representative from SIBERKREASI Digital Literacy National Movement (WSIS 2018 Champion)

Online Moderator: 

Rizki Ameliah

SDGs: 

GOAL 4: Quality Education
GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

IGF 2019 OF #35 Strengthening Digital Transformation through Digital Securit

Description: 

The unstoppable development of internet and easy access to social media today is shadowed by the spread of fake news. This emerging phenomenon has become such a worry for government around the world. Looking at trust in the media, it is important to recognize that not all countries place the same level of their awareness of misinformation and disinformation. Tackling the spread of online fake news is not an easy task for government. Increasingly, policymakers around the world are searching new ways to deal with this problem. Instead, policymakers around the world should look forward initiatives and mechanisms that would encourage the formulation of regulation to deal with harmful forms of content.

At the global level, one-time MIT researchers reviewed a Twitter data set from 2006 to 2017, and analysed about 126 thousand rumours spread by around 3 million users. Then the fact is that the correct dissemination of the story (including clarification news) takes 6 times longer than the hoax to reach the level of exposure with the same number of people. Not only that, false news turns out that 70 percent is more retweeted than the actual story version

Indonesian government hold weekly ‘fake news’ briefings which aims to, at least, minimize the spread of disinformation in the social media. It also designed encourage Indonesians to think more critically about the news they consume. In addition, MCIT have designed a website called ‘stophoax.id’ that can accessible for public to cross-check the news and post the fake information that have been analyzed by the ministry’s team. Moreover, the National Police, particularly through its cyber crime directorate, have a procedure to be followed for fake news prevention called ‘preventive measures’, that is boosting digital literacy and diction so that the people can be wiser, smarter and more polite in using social media. According to forecast, the number of internet users in Indonesia is projected to grow to 150 million in 2023 (107 million by now). In 2014, it was estimated that around 87 percent of households in Indonesia had a mobile phone. Smartphone ownership in Indonesia has risen from 32.6 to 43.2 percent between 2014 and 2017. The number of smartphone users in Indonesia could reach as high as 96.2 million by the year 2021. But digital literacy has not followed.

In January 2019, Ministry of Communication and Informatics of Indonesia stated there were 175 hoaxes, and increasing to 353 news in February. The fact was so apprehensive considering Indonesia as the fourth most populous country on earth, and poses a large and fast-growing market for mobile technologies.

Some strategic steps could be implemented by governments such as: deeper systematic issues on how social media algorithms incentivize the spread of false or other forms of negative content; implement positive intervention include verifying the identity of people and organizations; regulation for social media and online news platform companies to create a public archive of all advertisements bought and sold to hold certain groups accountable for any dark advertisement.

Organizers: 

Ministry of Communication and Information Technology Republic of Indonesia
Organizers :
Ministry of Communication and Information Technology (MCIT) of the Republic of Indonesia

Co-Organizers :
1. Indonesian Digital Literacy National Movement: SIBERKREASI
2. Indonesia – Internet Governance Forum (ID IGF)

Speakers: 

Proposed Speakers :
1. Mr. Thomas Schneider (Ambassador and Director of International Affairs, Swiss Federal Office of Communications (OFCOM), Federal Department of the Environment, Transport, Energy and Communications (DETEC)*
2. Mr. Semuel Abrijani PAngerapan, Director General of ICT Application, MCIT Indonesia
3. Dr. Stephanie Borg Psaila, Interim Director, DiploFoundation*
4. Mr. Ryan Rahardjo, Google Indonesia*
5. Representative from European Commision
6. Representative from MAG Indonesia IGF

Online Moderator: 

Ivana Maida, Representative from SIBERKREASI Digital Literacy National Movement (WSIS 2018 Champion)

SDGs: 

GOAL 4: Quality Education
GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

IGF 2019 OF #37 Future Internet Governance Strategy for the European Union

Description: 

With the election of the new European Parliament and new European Commission, the EU will setup a new Internet Governance strategy for the coming 5 years.

Organizers: 

European Commission

Speakers: 

Pearse O'Donohue- European Commission

Online Moderator: 

Valentina Scialpi

SDGs: 

GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

IGF 2019 OF #38 Impacts of Consolidation in the Internet Economy

Description: 

Internet Society (ISOC) Open Forum is dedicated to IGF participants that shares the common goal of advocating for an open, globally-connected, trustworthy and secure Internet for everyone, and to our own ISOC community comprised of chapters, organizational and individual members.

Based on our Global Internet Report 2017: Paths to Our Digital Future, the ways in which the Internet Economy could evolve in the future could have significant implications for the other Drivers, such as Cyber Threats, Role of Governments, and Networks, Standards and Interoperability. During 2018, the Internet Society worked raising several questions linked to an increasingly consolidated Internet economy, including understanding the potential benefits and challenges of consolidation – to its users as well as to the Internet’s fundamental technical properties.

The Global Internet Report 2019 on Consolidation in the Internet economy outlined the benefits and the threats and what features from the current trends of consolidation are considered important as we look towards the future, it has prompted questions that have made it clear that consolidation is a topic that will require further work, this work should be done in collaboration with the broader Internet community.

The Open Forum will bring an opportunity to promote an interactive and collaborative session to tackle a key question: How consolidation of the Internet Economy will impact the Internet’s technical evolution and use in the future?

Agenda (60 min):
Part 1 - Initial remarks and setting the scene (20min)
Onsite Moderator:
• Future of the Internet: what actions we need to take now to shape our digital future (10 min)
o Andrew Sullivan, CEO (GIR 2019 + ISOC 2019 priorities)
• Overview of consolidation as it manifests in different layers of the Internet (10 min)
o Carl Gahnberg and/or Constance Bommelaer

Part 2 - Open Discussion (30 min):
Questions about Consolidation will be raised to be answered in breakout groups (3), each with at least one facilitator and one rappourteur.

(10 min) Conclusions: Each rapporteur will read a short summary from the groups discussions

Organizers: 

Internet Society

Speakers: 

Andrew Sullivan (CEO), Internet Society
Constance Bommelaer, Internet Society
Carl Gahnberg, Internet Society

Online Moderator: 

Paula Real

SDGs: 

GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

IGF 2019 OF #39 Artificial Intelligence – from Principles to Practice

Description: 

The transformation of society, government and industry being driven by AI systems requires coordinated and forward-looking public policy frameworks that are informed by government, industry, policy, technical experts and the public, to shape human-centric development and deployment of AI. This Open Forum will inform participants about the OECD Recommendation on Artificial Intelligence and seek feedback on priority areas for AI public policy and ideas for multi-stakeholder co-operation.

The OECD’s Committee on Digital Economy Policy agreed to form an AI expert group (AIGO) in May 2018, which completed its recommendations to the OECD in Dubai in February 2019. The OECD’s Committee on Digital Economy Policy then built on the recommendations to develop the first intergovernmental Recommendation for AI in March 2019, that is expected to be adopted at the annual OECD Ministerial Council Meeting in May 2019.

The Recommendation promotes human-centric AI that fosters innovation and trust. Complementing existing OECD standards in areas such as privacy, digital security risk management, and responsible business conduct, the Recommendation focuses on the features specific to AI and sets a standard that is implementable and flexible, so as to stand the test of time in a rapidly evolving field.

The Recommendation identifies five complementary value-based principles for the responsible stewardship of trustworthy AI that are relevant to all stakeholders: inclusive growth, sustainable development and well-being; human-centred values and fairness; transparency and explainability; robustness, security and safety; and accountability. It further calls on AI actors to promote and implement these principles according to their roles.

In addition, the Recommendation provides five recommendations to policy makers pertaining to national policies and international co-operation for trustworthy AI, namely: investing in AI research and development; fostering a digital ecosystem for AI; shaping an enabling policy environment for AI; building human capacity and preparing for labour market transformation; and international co-operation for trustworthy AI.

The OECD has started to move from principles to implementation with the second leg of our work on AI: the AI Policy Observatory to be launched in 2019. Through the Observatory, the OECD is working with a wide spectrum of partners from governments, industry, policy and technical experts and academia. The Observatory is a multidisciplinary, evidence-based and multi-stakeholder centre for policy-relevant evidence collection, debate and guidance for governments, while providing external partners with a single window onto policy-relevant activities and research on AI from across the OECD (more information on: http://oe.cd/ai)

Content of the Session

The first part of the session will focus on presenting and discussing the content of the OECD Recommendation on Artificial Intelligence and its role in helping to shape an international AI policy framework. Following an introduction to the Recommendation, Governments from several countries will provide their perspectives on its content.

In the second part of the panel, partner IGOs and technical, business and civil society representatives will be invited to discuss priorities to help policy makers move from principles to practice and priorities for the AI Policy Observatory. Interventions will build on the advanced initiatives underway including the IEEE’s Initiative on the Ethical Design of Autonomous and Intelligent Systems, the Partnership on AI to Benefit People and Society, the EC and UNESCO’s work on AI.

Interventions
1) The international AI policy framework and the role of the OECD principles for artificial intelligence:
• Mr. Wonki Min, Vice Minister of Science and ICT of Korea and Chairman of the OECD’s Digital Economy Committee.
• Ms. Fiona Alexander, Associate Administrator (Head of Office) for the Department of Commerce's National Telecommunications and Information Administration’s (NTIA) Office of International Affairs.
• Mr Katsuya Watanabe, Vice Minister for the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications, Japan.

2) Priorities for international and multi-stakeholder cooperation in moving from principles to practice, including through the AI Policy Observatory
• Ms. Lucy Siolli, Director for Digital Industry OR Ms. Silvia Viceconte, Head of Sector - Multilateral Affairs and Economic Cooperation, DG CONNECT at the European Commission.
• Mr. Cedric Wachholz, Chief of Section for ICT in Education, Science and Culture, UNESCO.
• Ms. Carolyn N’Guyen, Director of Technology Policy, Microsoft.
• Dr. Konstantinos Karachalios, Managing Director of the IEEE-Standards Association.
• Mr. Marc Rotenberg, President and Executive Director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC).

Diversity
This open forum is designed to provide diverse perspectives. It is balanced first in terms of stakeholder groups, with intergovernmental organisation representation through the OECD, UNESCO and the European Commission; private sector representation through Microsoft; technical community representation through the IEEE, and civil society representation through Marc Rotenberg. In terms of gender, the workshop will be balanced with the participation of at least three women. Participation of speakers from Asia, North America, Europe will ensure that the panel is geographically diverse.

Organizers: 

OECD

Speakers: 

• Mr. Wonki Min, Vice Minister of Science and ICT of Korea and Chairman of the OECD’s Digital Economy Committee.
• Ms. Fiona Alexander, Associate Administrator (Head of Office) for the Department of Commerce's National Telecommunications and Information Administration’s (NTIA) Office of International Affairs.
• Mr Katsuya Watanabe, Vice Minister for the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications, Japan.
• Ms. Lucy Siolli, Director for Digital Industry OR Ms. Silvia Viceconte, Head of Sector - Multilateral Affairs and Economic Cooperation, DG CONNECT at the European Commission.
• Mr. Cedric Wachholz, Chief of Section for ICT in Education, Science and Culture, UNESCO.
• Ms. Carolyn N’Guyen, Director of Technology Policy, Microsoft.
• Dr. Konstantinos Karachalios, Managing Director of the IEEE-Standards Association.
• Mr. Marc Rotenberg, President and Executive Director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC).

Onsite Moderator: Wonki Min

Online Moderator: Nobu Nishigata

Rapporteur: Karine Perset

Online Participation:

Remote participation will be facilitated by the remote moderator who will frequently communicate with the remote participants throughout the session to ensure their views/questions are reflected. The workshop will be promoted in advance and during the IGF on the OECD websites and via social media, through the hashtag #IGFOECD.

Discussion facilitation:

The moderator will set the stage by providing context for the workshop, will make sure all the different perspectives are represented throughout the discussions and about halfway through the session will seek input and questions from the floor as well as from remote participants.

Online Moderator: 

Nobu Nishigata

SDGs: 

GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals

IGF 2019 OF #40 EU Delegation & Youth IGF Movement

Description: 

The main idea of the present proposal for an Open Forum is to share with the IGF multistakeholder community the concept and the outcomes of the Youth IGF Movement meetings that took place around the world. The format of the Open Forum is intended to be a debate between the Youth IGF Movement leaders and experts of the Information Society, namely the members of the EU Delegation to the IGF, as well as the representatives of the Asia-Pacific community, African countries and Latin America. We would like also to invite the leaders of the private sector for discussion with these young leaders. The Open Forum welcomes the representatives of other youth initiatives to enagage in an inclusive dialogue with the experts of the IGF community. The discussion between the experts and the young representatives will be focused on the main outcomes of the meetings organised by the young at national and regional levels. A number of pilot projects that have been created by the youth as a result of national and regional YIGF meetings will be presented. One of the focus points will also be to see how the recommendations which emerged from the Open Forum in 2018 have been taken into consideration at national and regional levels and what are the achievements. The Open Forum will also focus on the role of the youth on raising awareness on Internet safety.

Organizers: 

TaC-Together against Cybercrime International
EU Delegation to the IGF

Speakers: 

EU Delegation, incl. EU Parliament MEPs
Nigel HICKSON - ICANN, VP
Lori S. Schulman - INTA, Senior Director
RIPE NCC (TBC)
African Union -Moctar YEDALY, Head of Dpt.
Youth IGF Algeria
Youth IGF Indonesia
Youth IGF Haiti
Youth IGF Lebanon
Youth IGF Portugal

Online Moderator: 

Ms SOUAD Abidi

SDGs: 

GOAL 4: Quality Education
GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities

IGF 2019 OF #43 Open Forum on conflict prevention, cooperation and stability

Description: 

The EU recognizes that the interconnected and complex nature of cyberspace requires joint efforts by governments, private sector, civil society, technical community, users and academia to address the challenges faced and calls on these stakeholders to recognize and take their specific responsibilities to maintain an open, free, secure and stable cyberspace.

In this context the EU intends to organize an Open Forum at the upcoming IGF in Berlin on the roles and responsibilities of all stakeholders in promoting "conflict prevention, cooperation and stability in cyberspace". This Open Forum will address the need for responsible normative behaviour by all stakeholders and should provide an outlook to further cooperation on the implementation of such behaviour within the mandates of each respective community.

Different speakers are to contribute to an interactive panel discussion. Speakers are to be confirmed but we are aiming to have a speaker coming from each community, i.e. governments, private sector, civil society, technical community and academia. These various perspectives should provide an overall reflection on what it means to contribute to "conflict prevention, cooperation and stability in cyberspace" and what activities should be undertaken within the responsibility of each stakeholder to further contribute to this objective.

Organizers: 

European External Action Service

Speakers: 

Speakers are to be confirmed but we are aiming to have a speaker coming from each community, i.e. governments, private sector, civil society, technical community and academia.

Online Moderator: 

Manon Le Blanc

SDGs: 

GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals

IGF 2019 OF #44 Disinformation Online: Reducing Harm, Protecting Rights

Description: 

This proposal is for a 60 minute panel discussion on approaches to tackling disinformation, drawing on the UK’s experience developing a new framework for tackling online harms.
We propose the session addresses the following themes:
Approaches to regulation while protecting freedom of expression;
Addressing vulnerabilities in the online environment and technological solutions to disinformation;
Empowering audiences and educational responses to disinformation;
Emerging challenges and the need to tackle wider online manipulation.

Organizers: 

Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Annie Ferguson (DCMS)
Nicola Aitken (DCMS)
Georgia Durbridge (DCMS)

Speakers: 

We have not reached out to other stakeholder contacts, but have identified a number of stakeholders with whom we work closely that we would look to include:
Academia - a leading researcher in disinformation from London School of Economics (LSE)
Industry - representative from Twitter
Intergovernmental organisation - representative from NATO Stratcomms
Other government speaker - Centre for International Digital Policy, Global Affairs Canada

Online Moderator: 

Oscar Tapp Scotting, Deputy Director Security and International, DCMS

SDGs: 

GOAL 3: Good Health and Well-Being
GOAL 4: Quality Education
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals

IGF 2019 OF #45 Information Sharing 2.0: privacy and cybersecurity

Description: 

It is widely recognized that sharing actionable information – information about vulnerabilities, malware indicators, and mitigation measures promotes cybersecurity. As cybersecurity law and policy has evolved, questions have been raised about the privacy implications of information sharing among organizations and between them and CSIRTs. Certain legislative texts such as the EU General Data Protection Regulation and the US Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act of 2015 tackles this uncertainty directly, by clarifying the conditions under which such information sharing is allowed. Still, there remain unanswered questions about the collection, use and sharing of such information, in light of heightened sensitivity to privacy protection in recent years.

The aim of the discussion is to explore the intent and effects of leading legislative texts such as the GDPRand the CISA rules, in search of examples of balanced legal rules that can promote both cybersecurity and data protection.

Drawing from the best practices put forth by the participants and comments from the audience, the panel will deal with the intent and pragmatic deployment of these and similar rules. The experiences shared can hopefully inform the global cybersecurity-privacy conversation for the benefit of stakeholders - CSIRTs, law and policy makers, privacy professionals and private companies - across the globe, in designing legal rules in this area.

.
The international community, by being receptive to such input, could enable the development of better global interfaces between domestic policies to enhance cybersecurity. Such an approach can constitute a fertile terrain for effective international conversations on cybersecurity to take place.

Guiding questions:
o What were the underlying considerations and legal factors behind the relevant provisions of the GDPR, CISA and other relevant legislative texts?
o In practical terms, how have these provisions been understood and implemented by the private and public sector in the context of cybersecurity?
o A majority of the processing activities in the cybersecurity context is focused on machines and not on their users, and the data collected is mainly technical. How does that affect the analysis of applicable data protection laws?
o What are the main lessons for developing cyber law and policy?
o What are the main issues to take into account for global interoperability in this area?

Organizers: 

Israel National Cyber Directorate

Speakers: 

Dr. Yaniv Benhamou, Lecturer University of Geneva (Moderator)
Mr. Amit Ashkenazi, Head of the Legal Department, Israel National Cyber Directorate
Belisario Contreras, Manger Cybersecurity Program at Organization of American States
Andrew Cormack, Chief regulatory adviser, Jisc technologies, https://www.jisc.ac.uk/staff/andrew-cormack, [TBD]
Legal/Policy Representative from Fireeye [https://www.fireeye.com/] [TBD]
Counsel of Europe/EU Commission representative [TBD]

Online Moderator: 

Yaniv Benhamou

SDGs: 

GOAL 3: Good Health and Well-Being
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 17: Partnerships for the Goals