You are here

Cybersecurity, Trust and Privacy

IGF 2018 WS #382 The Future of Digital Identity and Human Rights

IGF 2018 WS #382 The Future of Digital Identity and Human Rights
Additional Speakers: 

Raman Jit Singh Chima (Access Now; speaker)

Brett Solomon (Access Now; moderator)

IGF 2018 WS #393 CLOUD Act & e-Evidence: implications for the Global South

IGF 2018 WS #393 CLOUD Act & e-Evidence: implications for the Global South

IGF 2018 WS #421 Algorithmic transparency and the right to explanation

IGF 2018 WS #421 Algorithmic transparency and the right to explanation

How do individuals seek recourse when they are affected by automated decisions? What are the implications for justice when automated decision-making such as Artificial Intelligence (AI), Machine Learning (ML) or Deep Learning (DL) or an automated script or piece of software is involved in making or influencing a legal decision that has a legal or significant effect on another person? Under the EU General Data Protection Regulation individuals or “data subjects” have a “right to explanation” with regards to the reasons behind automated decisions that could significantly affect them. This “right to explanation” arises from a combination of rights afforded to data subjects under the GDPR in particular article 22 of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) states that “The data subject shall have the right not to be subject to a decision based solely on automated processing, including profiling, which produces legal effects concerning him or her or similarly significantly affects him or her”. Article 22 is further interpreted interpreted by the Working Party on Data Protection in their Guidelines on Automated Decision-making. Issues discussed will involve: Algorithmic bias: It is important that if algorithms affect our lives, they do not have bias, and that they are impartial. they are transparent and understandable Algorithmic transparency and the right to explanation: When people are affected by algorithms there must be an ability to explain why an algorithm has made a decision. How is this achieved in reality when the effects of code are hard to understand, and much automation and algorithms happen behind proprietary "black boxes" of obscured code?

 

Alex Comninos, Independent Researcher, Civil Society

Imane Bello, Lecturer and Researcher, Sciences Po, Academia

Lorena Jaume-Palasi, Ethical Tech Society, Civil Society

Chinmayi Arun, Assistant Professor of Law at National Law University Delhi, Academia

Joy Liddicoat, University of Otago, Academia

Karen Reilly, Independent, Business and Technical Community

Agenda: 

Part 1: Lightning talks - 25 minutes
- Each speaker gives a "lighting talk" of max 2 minutes on their specific area of intervention/expertise.

Part 2: Breakaway group discussion - 20 Minutes
- Breakaway groups discussing different aspects of algorithmic transparency
- The remote participants will organise an internet breakaway group
- Someone from each group volunteers to rapporteur

Part 3: Report back from breakaway group discussions - 10 Mintes
- Rapporteurs report back and display their flip charts
- Remote participants, the internet reports back
- Some panelists take notes and document in order to create an outcome document for the event.

Part 4: Questions - 5 - 10 minutes

Wrap up with questions and interventions from audience and remote participants.

IGF 2018 WS #50 Whois collected, disclosed and protected: CERTs viewpoint

IGF 2018 WS #50 Whois collected, disclosed and protected: CERTs viewpoint
Additional Speakers: 

Becky Burr. ICANN Board member.

Farzaneh Badii. Noncommercial Stakeholder Group. ICANN.

Grégory Mounier, Europol

Jac Sm Kee, APC Women

Farzaneh Badii, Georgia Institute of Technology

Agenda: 

10 minutes - Introduction: primary use and purpose of WHOIS. Accountability on the Internet. Anonymous behavior.
30 minutes - Discussion: Use of Whois by the CERT community. How IP address operators or domain name holders are informed about a security incident affecting them? Can registration data help identify individual malicious actors? Why is important that CERTs maintain access to Whois private data? To what degree has the security community made a successful case for the collection of WHOIS data under GDPR rules? What existing or new technical means of access can be used and deployed to provide access to a limited set of accredited security actors? Who accredits the security actors?
20 minutes - Answering to questions.
10 minutes - Closing

IGF 2018 WS #75 Approaches to a Wicked Problem: Stakeholders Promote Enhanced Coordination and Collaborative, Risk-Based Frameworks of Regional and National Cybersecurity Initiatives

IGF 2018 WS #75 Approaches to a Wicked Problem: Stakeholders Promote Enhanced Coordination and Collaborative, Risk-Based Frameworks of Regional and National Cybersecurity Initiatives
Additional Speakers: 
  • Barrett, Kerry-Ann; Organization of American States (government)
  • Craig, Amanda Microsoft, (private)
  • Dutton, Bill; Global Cyber Security Capacity Centre, University of Oxford (civil society)
  • Shannon, Greg; Chief Scientist for the CERT Division at Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute, and Vice Chair of IEEE Internet Initiative (civil society)
  • van Duren, David; GFCE (government)
  • Wilches, Juan Manuel Commissioner, Comision de Regulacion de Comunicaciones, Government of Colombia (government)
Agenda: 
  1. Cybersecurity Challenges Create Need for Collaborative Solutions: Importance of Multistakeholder Participation
  2. Why regional approaches are necessary regarding such issues as strategy development, cyber risk frameworks, CSIRT, awareness raising, cybercrime, and research
  3. What are the benefits of global but also regional coordination
  4. Why a Voluntary, Risk-Based Approach Is Optimal
  5. The Importance of Finding Consensus Among Global Stakeholders: International Standards and Trade and how can they be translated for other communities, such as academia, private sector, civil society, and intergovernmental initiatives
  6. Design Principles to “Build in Security” from the Start
  7. Addressing Capacity-Building Challenges: What Policies/Support Are Needed for Implementation?
  8. It is clear that investment remains national. Are there opportunities to improve the return on investment of cybersecurity capacity building projects to nations, such as through better coordination of systems, better metrics to access their outcomes, and improved identification and prioritisation of cybersecurity risks
  9. Wrap Up

IGF 2018 WS #80 Hack the Hate: Empower society to face hate speech

IGF 2018 WS #80 Hack the Hate: Empower society to face hate speech
Additional Speakers: 

1. Speakers (conference part):

- Tonei Glavinic, Director of operations of the Dangerous Speech Project (United States of America);

- Alexandria Walden, Free expression and human rights at Google (United States of America);

- Nalaka Gunawardene is a leading commentator and analyst on social, cultural and political impacts of information and communications technologies (ICTs) in Sri Lanka (South Asia). 

- Robi Chacha, Program Officer under the Safety & Dignity Program at Amnesty International (Kenya);
 

Moderator (conference part): 

- Sasha Havlicek, CEO of the Institute for Strategic Dialogue (United-Kingdom).

2. Project founders (pitch part):

- Guillaume Buffet, Founder of the Seriously project and Vice-president of Renaissance Numérique (France). He will present the seriously platform (www.seriously.ong) : a tool and a method to pacify online discussions;

- Louis Brooke from Breakthrough Media (United-Kingdom). He will present the activities of the company. This private company works closely with the UK government and the civil society in order to co-create online campaigns and movements that address complex social challenges, including extremism;

- Cristiana Lucaci, Vice President of Group of the European Youth for Change (Romania). She will present an innovating educational program on online civic education;

Christine Vidal, President of the association Le Bal (France). She will present the work made by her association in a classroom called “the truly identity of cats”.

Pages

Contact Information

United Nations
Secretariat of the Internet Governance Forum (IGF)

Villa Le Bocage
Palais des Nations,
CH-1211 Geneva 10
Switzerland

igf [at] un [dot] org
+41 (0) 229 173 678