IGF 2019 WS #421 IPv6: Why should I care?

Organizer 1: Technical Community, Latin American and Caribbean Group (GRULAC)
Organizer 2: Technical Community, Latin American and Caribbean Group (GRULAC)
Organizer 3: Technical Community, Latin American and Caribbean Group (GRULAC)
Organizer 4: Technical Community, African Group
Organizer 5: Technical Community, Latin American and Caribbean Group (GRULAC)
Organizer 6: Technical Community, Latin American and Caribbean Group (GRULAC)
Organizer 7: Civil Society, Asia-Pacific Group
Organizer 8: Technical Community, Latin American and Caribbean Group (GRULAC)

Speaker 1: Marco Hogewoning, Technical Community, Western European and Others Group (WEOG)
Speaker 2: Mukom Akong Tamon, Technical Community, African Group
Speaker 3: Antonio Marcos Moreiras, Technical Community, Latin American and Caribbean Group (GRULAC)

Policy Question(s): 

This tutorial has the objective of answering the following policy questions:
1) What is an IP? What is its importance to the Internet?
2) What is the difference between IPv4 and IPv6? Why does the Internet need to migrate from IPv4 to IPv6?
3) Why is IP relevant to digital inclusion? How can IP migration affect digital inclusion?
4) How does IP affect the common Internet user?
5) What are the roles of each stakeholder to help with this migration?
6) What are the impacts if IPv6 is not deployed on the Internet?

Relevance to Theme: Currently, the amount of free IPv4 public addresses that can be allocated to machines are depleting. According to some studies made by Regional Internet Registries (RIRs), it is expected that in less than 5 years there will be no more IPv4 public addresses to be assigned. Some measurements made by relevant Internet companies such as Google, Akamai and Cisco, indicates that only more than a quarter of the Internet traffic is running on IPv6. For more than 30 years the Internet has used IPv4 and now it is time to IPv4 be replaced by its successor IPv6. Then, the IPv6 deployment is a relevant issue to a successful digital inclusion, mainly in the developing countries and the Global South.

Additionally, some studies claim that almost half of the global population has Internet access. This means that the other half of the world is still waiting to be included in this Internet ecosystem. This is worrisome as Internet access should be a catalyst for the enjoyment of human rights, most notably, the right to freedom of expression, according to the United Nations (UN). However is it really possible to guarantee Internet access to everyone with today's infrastructure?

The goal of this tutorial is to raise awareness of Internet users to the importance of IPv6 for successful digital inclusion. We will focus on a technical issue that we are facing right now which jeopardizes the digital inclusion of half of the world. If we do not raise awareness to this topic now, we might face serious problems regarding their digital inclusion in the near future.

Relevance to Internet Governance: According to the UN, the Internet is a catalyst for the enjoyment of human rights, most notably, the right to freedom of expression. This means that digital inclusion should focus on guaranteeing Internet access to those who do not have it yet, especially in developing countries.

Governments play a fundamental role in encouraging businesses to include a social dimension to their activities. In some regions far from the developed centers it is difficult to an Internet service provider to build Internet infrastructure. It is too expensive and usually it is only possible with the help of the government.

Private sector is the core of the Internet, as the majority of Autonomous System that composes the Internet are from this stakeholder group. Also, Internet Service Providers (ISPs) have an essential role because they are responsible for providing Internet connection in people's homes.

Civil society has perhaps the most important role, as digital inclusion refers directly to people. This stakeholder group defends human rights and how to empower people through the use of the Internet. One of the ways of doing that is the development of community networks, which can provide Internet access in distant areas. These networks are being implemented with the help of the technical community, which are involved in promoting training courses to empower people with knowledge.

Format: 

Tutorial - Auditorium - 30 Min

Description: The session is structured in three segments. The first segment will be a presentation of an introduction on the general topic made by the moderator (3 minutes). A 21-minute segment will follow in which the topic will be explained in more detail by each speaker. Lastly, a 6 minute open mic session will be held to enforce the discussion with the audience about the topic

Agenda:
3 min - Introduction to the theme made by the moderator.
21 min - explanation about the issue and the importance of the IPv6 awareness to digital inclusion following the scheme:
.What is IP?
.What is IPv4
.What is IPv6
.What's the problem?
.Why is IPv6 relevant to digital inclusion?
.How does IP affect the common Internet user?
.What can you do about this?
.What are we doing about this
.RIR - Regional Internet Registry
.Digital Literacy about IP
.IPv6 training courses
.Online courses
6 min - open mic for questions

Expected Outcomes: The expected outcome of this tutorial is to disseminate knowledge about IPv4 and IPv6 and how this migration affect the Internet users.

Another expected outcome is to raise awareness about the importance of how critical IPv6 is to digital inclusion and what can be done to increase its adoption.

Discussion Facilitation: 

The discussion will be facilitated by the on site moderator who will guide the tutorial during the workshop as well as during the Q&A and comments session in the end. The online moderator will make sure the remote participants are represented in the debate.

Online participation and interaction will rely on the WebEx platform. Those joining the session using WebEx (either invited members of the round-table or the general audience) will be granted the floor in the open debate segment of the workshop. People in charge of the moderation will strive to entertain onsite and remote participation indiscriminately. Social media (Facebook, but not Twitter or Reddit, since they do not support IPv6) will also be employed by the online moderators who will be in charge of browsing social media using hashtag (to be defined).

Lastly, having two moderators will facilitate the control of time, which will be very important for the proper functioning of the workshop.

Online Participation: 

Online participation and interaction will rely on the WebEx platform. Those joining the session using WebEx (either invited members of the round-table or the general audience) will be granted the floor in the open debate segment of the workshop. People in charge of the moderation will strive to entertain onsite and remote participation indiscriminately.

Proposed Additional Tools: Social media (Facebook, but not Twitter or Reddit, since they do not support IPv6) will also be employed by the online moderators who will be in charge of browsing social media using hashtag (to be defined).

SDGs: 

GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities