IGF 2020 WS #187 Open data For Women and Persons with disabilities

Time
Monday, 9th November, 2020 (07:40 UTC) - Monday, 9th November, 2020 (08:40 UTC)
Room
Room 1
About this Session
Open Data is data which is made accessible and available in a standardized machine-readable format and under a license that allows it to be re-used and re-shared. Open data policies should be able to provide frameworks for opening up access to government data and provide governance mechanisms. Policies from governments should always highlight the requirements for the successful implementation of open data for all people including Women and Persons with disabilities.
Thematic Track

Organizer 1: Joan Katambi, Uganda Institute of Information and Communications Technology
Organizer 2: Rebecca Ryakitimbo, KsGEN
Organizer 3: Peace Oliver Amuge, Women of Uganda Network( WOUGNET)
Organizer 4: Eileen Kwiponya, The Technical University of Kenya
Organizer 5: Innocent Adriko, Internet Society -Youth IGF Ambassadors

Speaker 1: Joan Katambi, Intergovernmental Organization, African Group
Speaker 2: Rebecca Ryakitimbo, Civil Society, African Group
Speaker 3: Peace Oliver Amuge, Civil Society, African Group
Speaker 4: Eileen Kwiponya, Civil Society, African Group
Speaker 5: Innocent Adriko, Civil Society, African Group

Additional Speakers

Speaker 6: Shamim Nampijja, Civil Society, African Group

 

 

 

Moderator

Peace Oliver Amuge, Civil Society, African Group

Online Moderator

Rebecca Ryakitimbo, Civil Society, African Group

Rapporteur

Joan Katambi, Intergovernmental Organization, African Group

Format

Round Table - Circle - 60 Min

Online duration reset to 60 minutes.
Policy Question(s)

2) Digital identity Topics: digital ID, consent, identity management, autonomy, personal data control, self-determination, privacy, biometrics, decentralized identities, certified identities. Example: What are/should be the rights and responsibilities for individuals in determining the use of their personal data, and what right do individuals have to determine their own digital identity? 3) Data-driven emerging technologies Topics: artificial intelligence, IoT, algorithms, facial recognition, blockchain, automated decision making, machine learning, data for good. Example: What is the impact of AI and other data-driven technologies in the exercise of rights of most vulnerable groups? How to implement them to further advance their inclusion and avoid further harm? 5) Data access, quality, interoperability, competition & innovation Topics: data concentration, data trusts/pools, data quality, technical standards, interoperability, open data, data portability, competition, innovation. Example: What are the competitive, developmental, Human Rights, ethical, regulatory and technical issues raised by increased concentration of data? 6) Data & Jurisdiction Topics: digital sovereignty, data localisation, data flows, extraterritorial rules, cross border law enforcement, emergency procedures for data access, digital cooperation. Example: To what extent, if any, could the development of international norms and principles facilitate common approaches and interoperability of data protection frameworks, and also facilitate international trade and cooperation?

6. What are the issues, challenges and/or opportunities you intend to address? * Issues to be addressed

• Encourage governments to establish open data governance framework that involve Women and PWDs.

• The need to have standard formats for publishing data that women and PWDs can interpret

• The need to have platforms that provide open data.

• The need to have the right datasets and data dictionaries

Challenges to be addressed

• Availability of the data

• Accessibility by all vulnerable groups like women and PWDs

• Standard formats

• interpretation Opportunities

• Enabling participatory governance

• Improved government transparency and accountability

• Share data

• Support for innovation

• Improved efficiency and effectiveness of government services

• Evidenced based Policy development Process;

SDGs

GOAL 4: Quality Education
GOAL 5: Gender Equality
GOAL 8: Decent Work and Economic Growth
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

Description:

Introduction

In recent years there has been an increasing interest in Open Data, leading to the implementation of many initiatives and platforms to publish open datasets and build capacity around data use and help improve decision and policy making across the different sectors in the region. The open data movement in the area of access to public and other information is a relatively new but very significant in the East African Region States namely (Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Rwanda, Burundi and South Sudan)

Description of the content

Open Data is data which is made accessible and available in a standardized machine-readable format and under a license that allows it to be re-used and re-shared. Open data policies should be able to provide frameworks for opening up access to government data and provide governance mechanisms. Policies from governments should always highlight the requirements for the successful implementation of open data for all people including Women and Persons with disabilities. These policies must aim at making all public sector data open by default with exception to personal identifiable information and data with security or commercial or intellectual property rights or environmental restrictions. Open data is known to be digital data that is made available with the technical and legal characteristics necessary for it to be freely used, re-shared reused, and redistributed by anyone, anytime, and anywhere. This therefore means Women and Persons with disabilities must have ICT tools and Infrastructure to be able to access the Open Data on Government platforms. However, there is a growing concern that some Women and Persons with disabilities are being left behind in accessing information on Open Data. This is because, despite the recent expansion in the usage of ICT in the region, a large section of Women and persons with disabilities face digital exclusion due to lack of access and affordability of the requisite ICT tools and equipment, yet the major goal for Open Data is to increase Women’s and Person’s With Disabilities participation in policy making processes across all sectors. For example Uganda has laws which guarantee access to information by the people and disclosure of the same by government. A good example is the Access to Information Act (ATIA) 2005 which manifests a step forward for government’s willingness to provide useful public information. However, accessing information does not guarantee open data. In principle, open data should be complete through making it publicly available and not subject to valid privacy, security or privilege limitations, Primary where data is as collected at the source, with the highest possible level of granularity, not in aggregate or modified forms, timely by making it available as quickly as necessary to preserve the value of the data. The Ministry of ICT in Uganda has been developing an Open Data Policy and the first draft was out in May 2017. The Uganda Open Data portal does exit however more work needs to be done to ensure people understand the datasets and they can interpret them. For Kenya, According to the Centre for public impact Foundation Report released in 2010, a new Kenyan constitution was codified. this included access to information obligations, which required the Government to publish and publicize any important information affecting the country. The citizens’ rights to information are set out in Article 35, Access to information. “35.(1) Every citizen has the right of access to (a) information held by the State; and (b) information held by another person and required for the exercise or protection of any right or fundamental freedom (3) The State shall publish and publicize any important information affecting the nation, the report said, the Kenya Open Data initiative has made Government datasets available to the public in easy reusable formats with data from the different Categories across all sectors of the economy. However it doesn’t clearly indicate on how Women and People who are differently enabled will be able to access and interpret the Open Data. For Tanzania, The Tanzanian open data portal describes its purpose as making data publicly available, a wide range of actors being brought into the policy making process and debate, bringing valuable new ideas and new thinking to policy making, and stronger public participation in monitoring and citizen feedback. In Tanzania, an Open Data movement was initiated through the dLab project in order to realize the benefits of open data. So Tanzania has got a Basic Statistics Portal that provides Open Data in a machine-readable format to be used and re-used by anybody. The data produced is prioritized for Education, Water and Health sectors only. The methodology should work upon having all the East African Countries develop frameworks that will improve policy formulation, coordination and implementation of the Open Data initiative while enabling access and inclusion for Women and Persons with Disabilities in the East African Region. Conclusion

Across the region, all the East African countries have Open Data policies that allow for access and share of information, however these policies don’t further explain how Women and Persons with Disabilities will be able to access this Open Data and how it can be interpreted. Intended Agenda of the Session The session panelists will talk about different areas of this topic, after each panelist speaking the floor would be open to the participants to ensure that we get comments, additional information and policy issues or strategies to ensure that Women and Persons with disabilities access open data and can meaningfully use it. The content of discussions will be; the current state of open data in the East African States, The policies and regulations that exists and the gaps, The reality of how Women and Persons with disabilities access open data and the challenges they face. This session will be conducted in a round table discussions to ensure that its participatory and enhance substantive policy discussions.

Expected Outcomes

1. Out lined strategies to ensure Women and PWDs access open data

2. Identify the policy gaps and the advocacy areas to be taken

3. Establishment of collaborations and movements with the agenda to enhance access to open data by women and Persons with disabilities (PWDs) plus other vulnerable groups.

4. An article will be published to further disseminate the out comes and encourage discussion further.

5. Follow up events in the regional IGFs and the next Global IGF to keep the discussion going and involve all the key stakeholders.

The session panelists will talk about different areas of this topic, after each panelist speaking the floor would be open to the participants to ensure that we get comments, additional information and policy issues or strategies to ensure that Women and Persons with disabilities access open data and can meaningfully use it. The content of discussions will be; the current state of open data in the East African States, The policies and regulations that exists and the gaps, The reality of how Women and Persons with disabilities access open data and the challenges they face. This session will be conducted in a round table discussions to ensure that its participatory and enhance substantive policy discussions.

Relevance to Internet Governance

This session is very relevant as part of Internet Governance ecosystem to let the world know how far Developing countries are in-terms of implementing Open Data Policies as we do recognize that free access to, and subsequent use of, Government data is of significant value to society and the economy, and that Governments data therefore should be open by default to enhance policy and decision making processes leaving no one behind.

Relevance to Theme

Open Data is relevant to this thematic Track reason being Open Data acknowledge the need to promote the Global development and adoption of resources, standards, and policies for the creation, use, exchange, and harmonization of open data. Furthermore We recognize that Open data can only be unlocked when our citizens are confident that Open Data will not compromise their right to privacy, and that our citizens have the right to influence the collection and use of their own personal data or of data generated as a result of their interactions with governments.We also recognize that in order to be most effective and useful, data should be easy to compare within and between sectors, across geographic locations, in the different countries.

Online Participation

 

Usage of IGF Official Tool. Additional Tools proposed: We plan on using Zoom meeting application. We plan to run effective live stream with Question and Answer session support to generate more participation in our dialogue for the online participants.

 

1. Key Policy Questions and related issues
1.What are the existing legal frameworks on open data and what are the gaps these policies have?
2.What are the challenges being faced by the Persons with Disabilities?
3.What is the role of Civil Society Organizations and governments in ensuring women and PWDs access open data?

2. Summary of Issues Discussed

Open data policies should be able to provide frameworks for opening up access to government data and provide governance mechanisms. Policies from governments should always highlight the requirements for the successful implementation of open data for all people including Women and Persons with disabilities. These policies must aim at making all public sector data open by default with exception to personal identifiable information and data with security or commercial or intellectual property rights or environmental restrictions. Women and Persons with Disabilities lack enough representation when it comes to data policy formulation and implementation with the perception that they cannot use technology due to varied reasons of the society. This therefore means Women and Persons with disabilities must have ICT tools and Infrastructure to be able to access the Open Data on Government platforms.

3. Key Takeaways
Governments need to develop teams, strategies, action plans and policies in support of their commitments towards Open data. 
•Governments should add metadata to ensure that data can be understood by citizens especially women, minority groups, PWDs and found via search engines.
•Governments should clearly communicate the data they hold, Prioritize data to publish, Make data permanently accessible and findable
•Governments need to have standard formats for publishing data that women and PWDs can interpret.
•Governments should provide public data guidelines and standards for the publication of (open) government data on accessibility.
Establishment of collaborations and movements with the agenda to enhance access to open data by women and PWDs plus other vulnerable groups.
Civil Society Organizations need to run campaigns for Open data in order to create more awareness in all communities, for effective campaigns for open data they need to work with data technologists, informational professionals, computer experts, academia and ordinary citizens who advocate for greater access to government data.
 
6. Final Speakers

Speaker 1: Joan Katambi, Intergovernmental Organization, African Group
Speaker 2: Rebecca Ryakitimbo, Civil Society, African Group
Speaker 3: Peace Oliver Amuge, Civil Society, African Group
Speaker 4: Eileen Kwiponya, Civil Society, African Group
Speaker 5: Innocent Adriko, Civil Society, African Group

Speaker 5: Shamim Nampijja, Civil Society, African Group

7. Reflection to Gender Issues

Given the worth and value of open data, it is important that government data is accessible to everyone including women and Persons with disabilities. It is evident that most of the women in East Africa live in rural areas where digital inclusion has remained a challenge, with the high cost of the Internet in East Africa and connectivity challenges in many parts of the region, promoting open data has proved to be a nightmare. Whereas a percentage of the women access the Internet, it has continued a treat to the majority of the women especially in rural communities.

8. Session Outputs
  • Out lined strategies to ensure Women and Women and Persons with disabilities access Open Data.
  • Awareness on Open Data policies across East Africa.
  • The need to have standard formats for publishing data that women and Women and Persons with disabilities can interpret
  • The need to have platforms that provide open data.
  • The need to have the right datasets and data dictionaries
  • Establishment of collaborations and movements with the agenda to enhance access to Open Data by Women and Persons with disabilities plus other vulnerable groups.
9. Group Photo
IGF 2020 WS #187 Open data For Women and Persons with disabilities
10. Voluntary Commitment

I will use my organization Digital Literacy Initiative together with other partners such as civil society organizations, government agencies and academia among others to create more awareness in all communities about Open Data and access.