IGF 2020 WS #278 Updating International Approaches to Spyware Trade

Thematic Track

Organizer 1: Natalia Krapiva, Access Now
Organizer 2: Lucie Krahulcova, Access Now

Speaker 1: Iris de Villars, Civil Society, Western European and Others Group (WEOG)
Speaker 2: Paul Diegel, Government, Western European and Others Group (WEOG)
Speaker 3: Anstis Siena , Civil Society, Western European and Others Group (WEOG)

Moderator

Lucie Krahulcova, Civil Society, Western European and Others Group (WEOG)

Online Moderator

Natalia Krapiva, Civil Society, Western European and Others Group (WEOG)

Rapporteur

Natalia Krapiva, Civil Society, Western European and Others Group (WEOG)

Format

Panel - Auditorium - 60 Min

Policy Question(s)

1) Cybersecurity policy, standards and norms What are the gaps in existing approaches to spyware trade? What are the ways in which policy and regulation can contribute towards bridging those gaps? What are the roles that different stakeholders can play in these efforts?

We will identify the gaps in existing approaches to spyware trade, the ways in which policy and regulation can contribute towards bridging those gaps, as well as highlight the roles that different stakeholders can play in these efforts. The gendered impacts of the sub-sector of “stalkerware” and other tools facilitating intimate partner violence will receive particular attention.

SDGs

GOAL 3: Good Health and Well-Being
GOAL 5: Gender Equality
GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

Description:

Many countries have enacted export controls on dual-use technologies, including surveillance and spyware technologies, to regulate their potential harmful use and contribute to the stability and trust in the international system. There are also regional and international regulations and frameworks concerning spyware and dual use, largely focused on export controls, such as the EU Dual-Use Regulation and the Wassenaar Arrangement. The effectiveness of these regimes and frameworks has been repeatedly tested as the use of invasive spyware technologies by authoritarian governments has proliferated, resulting in egregious human rights violations around the world. These violations do not fall equitably, but rather target human rights defenders, journalists, and women and girls specifically. Civil society has been calling for stronger export controls, more accountability and greater transparency from governments and companies to address and prevent these violations in the future. This workshop is aimed at identifying the gaps in existing approaches to spyware trade, the ways in which policy and regulation can contribute towards bridging those gaps, as well as highlighting the roles that different stakeholders can play in these efforts. To that end, we will convene representatives from the UN, EU, civil society, as well as companies, to discuss the national regimes, EU export control regulation, international agreements, as well as efforts by private companies. The gendered impacts of the sub-sector of “stalkerware” and other tools facilitating intimate partner violence will receive particular attention. We will allow 5 minutes for an introduction, 10 minutes for each of the 4 speakers to present and then address questions from the moderator and the audience.

Expected Outcomes

We expect this session to feed into a larger effort of strengthening international, regional, and national spyware trade regimes. It will also feed into the private meeting on international litigation, including spyware, called Digital Rights Litigators Network meeting, that we are planning to hold at IGF 2020.

The moderators will make introductory remarks, ask questions, facilitate the Q&A from the audience

Relevance to Internet Governance: Our session directly relates to Internet Governance, since it seeks to identify gaps in current regimes governing spyware trade and strengthen them through policy and regulation.

Relevance to Theme: Better spyware trade regimes would enhance stability and trust in the international system. It will also enhance security and resilience of the infrastructure, systems and devices, and make people more safe and secure. During the session, we will discuss strategies and best practices for protecting both systems and users, along with the appropriate roles and responsibilities of governments, private sector, technical community, civil society and academia, while taking into account multidisciplinary perspectives.

Online Participation

 

Usage of IGF Official Tool.