IGF 2021 WS #137 Multi-stakeholder approaches for the Design of AI Policies

Time
Wednesday, 8th December, 2021 (14:05 UTC) - Wednesday, 8th December, 2021 (15:35 UTC)
Room
Conference Room 1+2

Organizer 1: Prateek Sibal, UNESCO
Organizer 2: Vanessa Dreier, UNESCO
Organizer 3: Tim Gelissen, i4Policy Foundation
Organizer 4: Raashi Saxena, i4Policy Foundation

Speaker 1: Hillary Bakrie, Intergovernmental Organization, Intergovernmental Organization
Speaker 2: Jibu Elias, Government, Asia-Pacific Group
Speaker 3: Eleanor Sarpong, Civil Society, African Group
Speaker 4: Esther Kunda, African Group
Speaker 5: Joanna Bryson 

Additional Speakers

Nanjira Sambuli, researcher, policy analyst and strategist interested in and working on understanding the unfolding, gendered impacts of ICT adoption on governance, media, entrepreneurship and culture.

Moderator

Vanessa Dreier, Intergovernmental Organization, Intergovernmental Organization

Online Moderator

Intergovernmental Organization, Intergovernmental Organization

Rapporteur

Jonathan Stever, Civil Society, African Group

Format

Break-out Group Discussions - Round Tables - 90 Min

Policy Question(s)

Digital policy and human rights frameworks: What is the relationship between digital policy and development and the established international frameworks for civil and political rights as set out in the Universal Declaration on Human Rights and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and further interpretation of these in the online context provided by various resolutions of the Human Rights Council? How do policy makers and other stakeholders effectively connect these global instruments and interpretations to national contexts? What is the role of different local, national, regional and international stakeholders in achieving digital inclusion that meets the requirements of users in all communities?
Inclusion, rights and stakeholder roles and responsibilities: What are/should be the responsibilities of governments, businesses, the technical community, civil society, the academic and research sector and community-based actors with regard to digital inclusion and respect for human rights, and what is needed for them to fulfil these in an efficient and effective manner?

In the workshop we will address existing AI policies and digital strategies and take a look at them with the ROAM-X indicators emphasizing the multi-stakeholder lens. The aim is to assess existing models of multi-stakeholder participatory processes in the development of AI strategies and policies.

SDGs

4. Quality Education
5. Gender Equality
8. Decent Work and Economic Growth
10. Reduced Inequalities

Targets: SDG 4: Within UNESCO mandate for education and capacity building we aim at providing the broader audience with knowledge on AI Policy design and challenges connected to it, as well as fostering multi-stakeholder approaches to inclusive policy making on AI. SDG5: We specifically look at how to avoid gender inequality in Policy making by pointing out the need to address marginalized groups and consequences if they are not part of the decision-making process. SDG 8: We also emphasize the impact of AI Policy making on the Future of work from a gender perspective. SDG 10: With the multi-stakeholder approach of the workshop and transfer into procuts for Policy making we aim at reducing the inequalities between countries. With our tools we aim at promoting peaceful and inclusive societies and to build effective, accountable and inclusive AI Policies by building capacity for institutions on the development of multi-stakeholder-based AI policies.

Description:

The workshop will build on the conclusions of the UNESCO report, “Steering AI and advanced ICTs for knowledge societies: a Rights, Openness, Access, and Multi-stakeholder Perspective”, to operationalize the ROAM-X indicators for multi-stakeholder approaches for AI policy making and to provide evidence-based guidance on policy co-creation efforts. In the workshop we will address existing AI policies and digital strategies and take a look at them with the ROAM-X indicators emphasizing the multi-stakeholder lens. The aim is to assess existing models of multi-stakeholder participatory processes in the development of AI strategies and policies. Use cases and best practices from the global south will be highlighted specifically. The aim is to inspire and equip participants with practical guidance and knowledge on designing inclusive policy co-creation processes and elaborating mechanisms for multi-stakeholder participation.

Expected Outcomes

The results of the discussions in the workshop will be used for a handbook to guide policy makers in the design and implementation of participatory and deliberative policy co-creation, to be developed by Innovation for Policy Foundation (i4Policy) through the Africa-Europe Digital Innovation Bridge (AEDIB) consortium with GIZ, the European Commission, and UNESCO. Outcomes of the workshop shall also be incorporated in a report on Activating Collective Intelligence for Artificial Intelligence Policy Frameworks.

A participatory and iterative learning workshop exploring experiences of utilizing collective intelligence processes in the design of AI policies to ultimately develop evidence-based guidance and practical checklists for national and regional policy makers will be provided.

We will use all tools possible to make our workshop interactive for online participants, encouraging exchange with speakers and organizers

Online Participation

Usage of IGF Official Tool.

Session Report (* deadline Monday 20 December) - click on the ? symbol for instructions
  • This workshop builds on the conclusions of the UNESCO report, “Steering AI and advanced ICTs for knowledge societies: a Rights, Openness, Access, and Multi-stakeholder Perspective”, to operationalize the ROAM-X indicators for multi-stakeholder approaches for AI policy making and to provide evidence-based guidance on policy co-creation efforts. The event aimed to address existing AI policies and digital strategies and examine them with the ROAM-X indicators emphasizing the multi-stakeholder lens.
  • All decision makers must make sure that each participant, especially those from traditionally marginalized groups, can voice their opinion and add to the discourse of AI Policy Development. AI-related discussions should be made more accessible, which includes knowledge sharing so all participants can contribute to the discussions. Meaningful inclusion should focus on the empowerment of all participants.
  • However, it is also important to acknowledge that much progress has already been made to create a multi-stakeholder environment in AI policy discussions. For instance, there is significant progression of gender diversity in the field of AI. Crucially, inclusion also means the acknowledgement of each person or country’s unique background and experience. Therefore, more attention should focus on AI policy work done by countries in the Global South.
  • To develop an effective multi-stakeholder approach, meaningful engagement with underrepresented groups including youths should be institutionally mandated in the principles of all UN programmes. Inter-generational partnerships are needed because young people need allies and partners who are currently in key positions and holding the power to make the change.
  • On the global level, valuable perspectives from developing regions often fall short due to the trap of tokenism which wrongly assume that a single person can represent an entire region. Meaningful diversity requires more fundamental changes to the status quo. To be truly inclusive, AI discussions should be conducted in languages beyond just English. 
  • Constraints for stakeholders from Civil Society, Government, Academia, Private Sector and beyond to meaningfully participate in processes to AI Policy Development are manifold and need to be addressed. These include but are not limited to: Connectivity, Access, Basic Digital Skills and understanding of AI systems.