IGF 2020 WS #126 Paris Call-Lessons Learned & Best Practices for Cyber Norms

Thematic Track

Organizer 1: Bruno Lete, The German Marshall Fund of the United States
Organizer 2: Groenendaal Laura, The German Marshall Fund of the United States
Organizer 3: Caroline Groene, Microsoft

Speaker 1: Liga Rozentale, Private Sector, Eastern European Group
Speaker 2: Park Nohyoung, Civil Society, Asia-Pacific Group
Speaker 3: Guilherme Patriota, Government, Latin American and Caribbean Group (GRULAC)

Moderator

Bruno Lete, Civil Society, Western European and Others Group (WEOG)

Online Moderator

Caroline Groene, Private Sector, Western European and Others Group (WEOG)

Rapporteur

Groenendaal Laura, Civil Society, Western European and Others Group (WEOG)

Format

Round Table - Circle - 90 Min

Policy Question(s)

How can different perspectives from stakeholders advance the debate on international norms for responsible state behavior? The added value of the Paris Call is that it brings so many different stakeholders together – but which challenges are these stakeholders facing? How can these be overcome when acting in a unified way in the framework of the Paris Call? How can the Paris Call be instrumentalized to overcome common challenges? Which actionable ideas and policies can be adopted to increase responsible behavior and make cyberspace more predictable? How can we increase access for external stakeholders, such as business and NGO’s, foster cooperation between different stakeholders and ensure that their ideas are being seriously considered in the UN cyber norms debate? How can these different perspectives advance the international debate on norms?

The Paris Call has already received significant backing, but nearly two years later, how can we continue to promote the principles enshrined in this declaration? Which actionable ideas and policies can be adopted to increase responsible behavior and make cyberspace more predictable? Which best practices to increase access for external stakeholders, such as business and NGO’s, and ensure that their ideas are being seriously considered in the UN cyber norms debate? Are there lessons learned to foster better cooperation between different stakeholders? Which obstacles do they encounter? In light of these questions, how can the Paris Call become a practical tool to advance the cyber governance debate at a global level, including the UNGGE and OEWG? Recognizing these challenges are essential if the Paris Call is to remain a valid tool for cyber governance.

SDGs

GOAL 9: Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure
GOAL 10: Reduced Inequalities
GOAL 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

Description:

The session will look at principles and actions that shape responsible state behavior in cyberspace. We want to look in particular at multistakeholder models and their ability to advance the debate on cyber norms, also at UN level. In this context we want to focus on the Paris Call for Trust and Security in Cyberspace because it is an initiative with worldwide support gathering a wide array of actors; states, public authorities and local governments, civil society and companies. Two years after the launch of the Paris Call we want to look how the Paris Call can continue to be a valuable tool for inclusive debate and for building more trust between different actors in various regions, and at the level of UN negotiations, or in cyberspace as a whole. What lessons have been learned? Which best practices can be shared? The moment for a conversation on the Paris Call remains timely. The UN Group of Governmental Experts on Advancing responsible State Behavior in Cyberspace is to submit its final report to the General Assembly in 2021. In addition, an Open-Ended Working Group (OEWG), established through resolution 73/27, will also report back to the General Assembly late 2020. In light of both upcoming events, it is important to put a spotlight on the value of multistakeholders and inclusive cyber governance (instead of relying solely on intergovernmental negotiations). This 90min. off-the-record roundtable/brainstorming will engage with a diverse group of policy makers, business leaders and independent opinion shapers. The purpose will be to gather their best practices and lessons learned, and to find practical ways for the Paris Call to serve as a helpful tool to advance the UN agenda on cyber norms. At the beginning, the moderator will ask 3 speakers to formulate short input to introduce the topic, (no speech or formal presentation). After these initial statements the format will encourage brainstorming and interactive dialogue in a candid atmosphere. We aim to gather a representative group (age, gender, sector, geography) of approximately 30 to 35 stakeholders.

Expected Outcomes

We want the participants at our roundtable to share their lessons learned and best practices, and to suggest new, actionable steps. As such, this discussion would make an important contribution to the policy discussion on international norms in cyberspace by providing attending representatives from various sectors and regions with innovate ideas and tools. By adding the Paris Call to the IGF agenda we also want to create more public awareness and understanding for this important initiative. This way we want to promote the role of external stakeholders in the debate and make the UN processes more inclusive. Moreover, GMF will also summarize these recommendations, and use our own expertise, to produce a policy brief on this topic that will be published to external audiences. The format of the event should also allow participants to forge new contacts and join a network of trust, an important by-product in its own right. Finally, this event will support ongoing and future GMF programming on cyber norms in general, including our work on Responsible State Behavior and our involvement in the EU’S Cyber Direct consortium.

The format of this 90min roundtable will be off-the-record to encourage brainstorming and interactive dialogue among the participants. By keeping the group relatively small (30 PAX) we strive to create an intimate and candid atmosphere where ideas can be shared in trust. Speakers will be asked to avoid speeches or formal presentations, but instead share their short but straightforward thoughts. Before the roundtable starts, we want to include a networking coffee table for people to meet.

Relevance to Internet Governance: The United Nations remains the best platform to shape global norms on state behavior in cyberspace. But, despite its achievements, the UN’s intergovernmental process struggles to make progress, not least because of deep divisions within the international community about which rules should apply in cyberspace. There is a need to reevaluate cyber governance efforts and to think of new practices that adopt a multi-stakeholder model, instead of relying solely on the current rigid intergovernmental approach. Initiatives like the November 2018 'Paris Call' encourage to believe that inclusive cyber governance is within reach, but fresh ideas on how to harvest the full potential of the Call are needed. There may be renewed energy for such discussion given that the UN’s First Committee has endorsed two parallel processes on cyber norms — the Open-Ended Working Group (OEWG) and a sixth round of the UN Group of Governmental Experts (UNGGE). The IGF would be the perfect place for such a discussion given its inclusive nature and wide attendance of government, private sector and civil society participants from all UN regions.

Relevance to Theme: The UNGGE and the OEWG are meant to work on a consensual basis but the volatile relations on cybersecurity between major powers such as China, the European Union, Russia, and the United States mean that finding trust, compromise and achieve consensus through an intergovernmental process very much remains an open question. There is therefore a need to re-evaluate cyber governance efforts and to think of new practices that also adopt a multistakeholder model, instead of relying solely on the current intergovernmental approach. Initiatives like the Paris Call can help bridge the trust gap between UN nations and the public-private-civil sectors.

Online Participation

 

Usage of IGF Official Tool.